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Welfare Reform on the Web (June 2002): Pensions - Overseas

INCOME SECURITY FOR OLDER PEOPLE: AN ASIAN PERSPECTIVE

R.K.A. Subrahmanya

International Social Security Review, vol.55, no. 1, 2002, p.49-65

Reviews existing pension provision in Asia and the Pacific Region and concludes that only a multi-tiered pension system can fully achieve the objective of old age protection. Author advocates government responsibility for the establishment of a basic pension scheme for all the population.

ISSUES IN PENSION SYSTEM DESIGN

M. Augusztinovics

International Social Security Review, vol. 55, no. 1, 2002, p. 21-35

Article shows that the debate about private versus public pension schemes has tended to overshadow some much more important questions, namely, the extension of coverage, the projected level of pensions, and the available means of financing. Ultimately, it would be illusory to propose a "model" to be applied to all countries without exception. Nevertheless the author proposes the adoption of a "code of conduct" for pension schemes, covering fundamental aspects applicable in all countries.

PROVIDING SOCIAL SECURITY IN A CONTEXT OF CHANGE: EXPERIENCE AND CHALLENGES IN LATIN AMERICA

F. M. Bertrammon and R. Rofman

International Social Security Review, vol. 55, no. 1, 2002, p. 67-82

The past twenty years have seen enormous upheavals in pension provision in Latin America. Article suggests that it is not yet possible to establish whether the reforms put in place following the example of Chile constitute an adequate social protection mechanism able to counteract the growing poverty of the elderly population. In fact, the radical reforms have not made it possible to achieve universal coverage, the principal challenge for social protection in all developing countries.

PUBLIC CHOICE ECONOMICS AND PUBLIC PENSION PLAN FUNDING: AN EMPIRICAL TEST

M. Schneider and F. Damanpour

Administration & Society, vol.34, 2002, p. 57-86

Public choice theory (PCT) assumes that elected officials and public administrators act in their self-interest, not in the public interest. This article tests the theory regarding the effects on U.S. public pension plans. The author develops several PCT-based hypotheses regarding plan funding and plan performance. The results indicate limited support for PCT. A positive relationship between the presence of boards of trustees and plan funding is found, but none between citizen voting and plan funding.

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