Click here to skip to content

Welfare Reform on the Web (June 2002): Education - UK - Schools

ACTIVE CITIZENSHIP IN SCHOOLS: A GOOD PRACTICE GUIDE TO DEVELOPING A WHOLE-SCHOOL POLICY

J. Potter

London: Kogan Page, 2002

This book demonstrates how active or involved citizenship can be adapted to benefit schools, students and their communities by identifying and meeting real needs as well as the demands of the National Curriculum. It will help provide educators with an understanding of what citizenship means and its implications.

THE BEST DAYS OF THEIR LIVES?

D. Abbott, J. Morris and L. Ward

Community Living, vol.15, no.3, 2002, p.20-21

Reports results of research into the views of disabled children on residential schools. Most missed not only their families but also the ability offered by their own homes to have their own space and routines. However residential schools offered more opportunities to form friendships. Support staff shortages at residential schools could cause problems.

BOARDING SCHOOLS: NATIONAL MINIMUM STANDARDS: INSPECTION REGULATIONS

Department of Health

London: TSO, 2002

Standards cover welfare policies, procedures and support for boarders; boarding house organization; staffing and premises. The standards will be used by the National Care Standards Commission for the welfare inspection of boarding schools.

CREATIONISM IN SCHOOLS "COULD PRODUCE BIGOTS"

S. Cassidy

Independent, Mar. 19th 2002, p.6

Secular campaigners have expressed fears that the government's enthusiasm for private sponsorship of state education will lead to cults such as the Moonies setting up schools that propagate their extreme views.

(See also Guardian, Mar. 19th 2002, p.9)

GOODBYE TO THE STATE SYSTEM

C. Woodhead

Daily Telegraph, Mar. 20th 2002, p.23

Proposes the abolition of state schools and the introduction of a voucher system under which parents would be able to purchase a place at an autonomous school of their choice.

GREEN PAPER TACKLES KEEPING YOUNG PEOPLE IN LEARNING

D. Boyer

Working Brief, no. 132, 2002, p.11-13

The green paper addresses the vexed issue of how to encourage young people to remain in education at least to the age of 19. Recommends breaking down the barriers between vocational and academic qualifications in order to remove the stigma attached to the former. Also proposes a matriculation diploma to be awarded at the age of 19 to help keep young people focused on learning. However, the papers offers no new proposals on financial support for students.

THE IMPACT OF THEORIES OF "NEW PUBLIC MANAGEMENT" ON THE PROVISION OF SUPPORT SERVICES FOR LOW-INCIDENCE SPECIAL NEEDS

O. Miller

European Journal of Special Needs Education, vol.17, 2002, p.67-75

Provision of support for pupils who are visually impaired is explored against a framework based on theories of "New Public Management". Recent government policy initiatives in teacher training and assessment and resources for special educational needs are reviewed and their impact on support for pupils with visual impairments is discussed. Finally, the impact of recent legislative changes is examined.

INCLUSIVE EDUCATION: ARE THEIR LIMITS?

J. Evans and I. Lunt

European Journal of Special Needs Education, vol.17, 2002, p.1-14

This study aimed to find out the views of a range of professionals in relation to inclusion. A questionnaire was sent to Principal Educational Psychologists in England and Wales, and focus group discussions of mixed groups of professionals were arranged to address questions of inclusive education. The study suggests that the present policy emphasis on parental choice, "league tables" and targets militates against inclusive education, especially for pupils with emotional and behavioural difficulties.

LEARNING COMMUNITIES: WHEN LEARNING IN COMMON MEANS SCHOOL SUCCESS FOR ALL

J. Gomez Alunso

Multicultural Teaching, vol.20, no.2, Spring 2002, p.13-17

Within a learning community, teachers, families, students, community members, and volunteers all become involved and collaborate to transform the school so that all the children can acquire the knowledge they need to operate in the information society. The process of transformation is based on communicative methodology and promotes high expectations of all the children. The process of learning is also transformed within the communicative approach: dialogic learning fosters the acquisition of instrumental abilities as well as reflection and solidarity, through dialogue on equal terms among everyone involved.

MANAGING PUPIL MOBILITY

Ofsted

2002

Report covers the effects on schools of high turnover of pupils and the successful strategies adopted by some schools to deal with them. These include: quickly forming relationships with parents and carers; giving new pupils prompt induction and information packs; quickly obtaining information on attainment from previous schools; preparing existing pupils for the new arrivals; and placing new pupils in appropriate teaching groups.

MORRIS ARGUES SPECIAL CASE FOR EDUCATION SPENDING

J. Kelly

Financial Times, Mar. 27th 2002, p.5

In an interview with the Financial Times, the Education Secretary argued that education should remain one of the priorities for extra funding during the period of the next comprehensive spending review. She claimed that Labour's reforms of primary education were not irreversible and needed further investment. There was also an urgent need for funding for the reform of 11-14 education.

MORRIS GETS TOUGH ON VIOLENT PARENTS

G. Owen

Times, Mar. 27th 2002, p.6

Reports that the Education Secretary has called for automatic prosecution of parents who assault teachers.

(See also Independent, Mar. 27th 2002, p.11; Guardian, Mar.27th 2002, p.11)

MUM'S ARMY "CAN SOLVE TEACHER SHORTAGES"

G. Owen

Times. Apr. 3rd 2002, p.4

The School Standards Minister has told NASUWT that teachers need to be released from mundane tasks to concentrate on teaching. Routine tasks would be carried out by classroom assistants. The union opposes the plan on the grounds that classroom assistants are likely to be used as junior teachers, devaluing the profession.

(See also Independent, Apr. 3rd 2002, p.4)

OVERALL IMPACT OF EXCELLENCE IN CITIES

L. Kendall, M. Morris and S. Stoney

Excellence in Cities Evaluation Consortium, 2002

Brief unpublished report summarises results from the first 18 months of the national evaluation of the Excellence in Cities programme. Findings being reported are based on first-year or baseline evidence. Describes results from:

  • a series of analyses of the first year school-teacher-pupil surveys;
  • work on various strand studies especially those related to the Gifted and Talented Programme, Learning Support Units and City Learning Centres;
  • the first study of school financing within EiC;
  • a comparative study of teachers in EiC and non-EiC schools;
  • baseline surveys of employers and training providers;
  • an initial press profile of EiC.

(For press summaries see Times, Apr. 11th 2002, p.7; Daily Telegraph, Apr. 11th 2002, p.12)

PROBLEM PUPILS "MUST BE TESTED AND FUNDED OR FACE EXCLUSION"

J. O'Leary and G. Owen

Times, Apr. 3rd 2002, p.4

The National Union of Teachers is pressing the government to amend the Education Bill to require local authorities to psychologically screen potentially troublesome youngsters at the request of head teachers before admitting them to school. Schools could then demand the necessary support to cope with pupils with behaviour problems. Head teachers could refuse to admit children who had not been screened.

PROMOTING ASSESSMENT AS LEARNING: IMPROVING THE LEARNING PROCESS

R. Dann

London, Routledge Falmer 2002

This book re-examines the relationship between assessment and learning in the classroom. It explores theories of learning and assessment within the context of national tests and self-assessment. It looks at ways of translating national policy into meaningful classroom practice and suggests ways for pupils to develop their own assessment skills through a process of consolidation, reflection and revision.

RESIDENTIAL SPECIAL SCHOOLS: NATIONAL MINIMUM STANDARDS: INSPECTION REGULATIONS

Department of Health

London: TSO, 2002

Standards cover:

  • children's rights;
  • child protection, care and control;
  • quality of care;
  • care planning;
  • premises, staffing and management.

These standards will be used by the National Care Standards Commission when it assumes responsibility for the welfare inspection of boarding schools, including residential special schools in 2002.

SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL NEEDS CODE OF PRACTICE

Anon

Child Right, no.184, 2002, p.11-13

Article summarises the provisions of the new code which is based on the principle that children with SEN should have those needs met, normally in mainstream schools and with the support of parents. Proposes a graduated approach to SEN provision from early years to school action. Covers partnership working with parents and pupil participation.

TEACHERS CALL FOR LAW TO CURB CLASSROOM VIOLENCE

R. Garner

Independent, Apr. 3rd 2002, p.4

NASUWT has called for a new offence of attacking a public service worker to be created to protect teachers from assault by violent pupils. Government feels legislation is not necessary.

(See also Guardian, Apr. 3rd 2002, p.7)

TEACHERS SET TO TAKE ON THE GOVERNMENT

R. Garner

Independent, Mar. 21st 2002, p.1

The Secretary of State for Education has been told to trim her bid for extra funding in the forthcoming Comprehensive Spending Review because priority will have to be given to more spending on the NHS. Teaching unions fear this could spoil their chances of agreeing a package to reduce teachers' workloads by employing more classroom assistants.

(See also Guardian, Mar.21st 2002, p.11)

TEACHING ASSISTANTS IN PRIMARY SCHOOLS: AN EVALUATION OF THE QUALITY AND IMPACT OF THEIR WORK

Ofsted

2002

Inspectors have found that as classroom assistants become more involved with pupil's learning they have less time to help teachers with routine tasks. Teachers also have to spend time planning the assistants' work. However the report found that teachers welcomed the extra adult presence in the classroom and that the assistants improved the quality of lessons.

"TIME OUT" FOR PRIMARY TEACHERS TO PREPARE

L. Lightfoot

Daily Telegraph, Apr. 3rd 2002, p.6

The Education Secretary has asked the Teacher's Review Body to consider the implications of changing teachers' contracts of employment to allow them "professional time" during which they could not be asked to teach.

Search Welfare Reform on the Web