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Welfare Reform on the Web (July 2002): Care of the Elderly - UK

ALL FOR ONE

A. Marriott and H Wright

Community Care, May 16th-22nd 2002, p. 38-39

Describes the work of inter-disciplinary teams established by Cheshire Council and health care providers with the aim of delivering rehabilitation to services to older people in more co-ordinated ways. Each team consists of a social worker, physiotherapist, occupational therapist, district nurse and community psychiatric nurse, with the social worker acting as care manager

CONTROLLING INFLUENCE

N. Valios

Community Care, Apr. 11th-17 2002, p. 32-33

Presents evidence that psychoactive drugs are being used to sedate troublesome residents of care homes and prison inmates.

HUMAN RIGHTS AND HOME CLOSURES

Anon

Registered Homes and Services, vol. 6, 2002, p. 186

In March 2002 the Court of Appeal rejected claims that an independent care home should be counted as a public authority and subject to human rights legislation because its residents were state funded.

INTERNATIONALIZATION OF LONG TERM CARE PROVISION : ECONOMICS AND STRATEGY

C Holden

Global Social Policy, vol. 2, 2002, p. 47-67

Article analyses the strategies of the three largest private providers of long term care in the UK. All three firms were found to have been internationalised rather than globalised as they retain a clear national base. They can be characterised as "market seeking" rather than "client following". The dual processes of internationalisation and concentration are expected to continue in the UK, as such firms take advantage of economies of scale and expel smaller providers from the market. The switch from public to private provision has facilitated increasing internationalisation and concentration as the logic of the market takes hold.

LEVEL HEADED

D. Brindle

Guardian Society, May 8th 2002, p. 4

Care homes will for the first time have to stick to uniform staffing levels under new national guidelines approved by the minister. The guidelines will apply immediately to all older people's homes seeking registration. Existing homes will be given one year's grace.

NOTHING PERSONAL

R. Brooks, S Regan and P Robinson

Community Care, May 9th-15th 2002, p. 30-31

Argues that it is unfair to maintain the current distinction between the nursing care required by elderly people which is provided free and their personal care requirements for which they must pay. Both are forms of health care. Removing the funding boundary would also make the system easier to understand and would be popular. However, authors warn that the unit costs of long term care provision are likely to rise because of the unsustainably low wages paid to care workers.

STANDARD OF CARE

C. D'Ambrosio

Charity Finance, May 2002, p. 38-39

Discusses the implications of the Care Standards Act 2000 for charities running care homes. Discusses the regulatory and inspection functions of the National Care Standards Commission and the implications of the new national minimum standards for care homes.

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