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Welfare Reform on the Web (July 2002): Social Security - UK

BUDGET 2002: ITS IMPACT ON CHILDREN

Anon

ChildRight, no. 185, 2002, p. 3

Outlines measures announced in the 2002 budget to help low income families, including the Child Tax Credit, the Working Tax Credit and assistance with childcare costs.

CHILD BENEFIT CUTS PLAN CONDEMNED

N. Morris and R. Gasher

The Independent, April 29th 2002, p. 1

The Prime Minister's investigation into the feasibility of stopping the benefits of parents of lawbreakers and truants has been widely criticised by back bench Labour MPs as being counter-productive. If implemented, a family with one child could lose £15.75 a week, rising to £17.55 for a single parent.

(See also Financial Times, April 29th 2002, p. 2; Times, April 29th 2002, p. 1; Guardian, April 29th 2002, p. 6)

CHILD TAX CREDIT COULD SEE END OF EMAs

L. Britton

Working Brief, no. 134, 2002, p. 8-9

The new Child Tax Credit which becomes operational in 2003 will give financial support to the parents of young people who stay on in full time education between 16 and 19. The impact of the new tax credit on the experimental Education Maintenance Allowance is unknown.

DARLING BACKS BILL TO CURB BENEFITS

G. Hurst

Times, May 1st 2002, p. 14

Government is to back a private member's bill which proposes stopping housing benefit payments to households whose members have been found guilty of anti-social behaviour twice in three years. It also proposes stopping payments to landlords who neglect their properties and fail to protect tenants.

(See also Financial Times, May 2nd 2002, p. 2; Guardian, May 2nd 2002, p. 8; Daily Telegraph, May 2nd 2002, p. 1)

PENSION CREDIT

Work and Pensions Committee

London: TSO, 2002 (House of Commons papers session 2001/02; HC 638)

Expresses concern that the Pension Credit may be too complicated a measure to have much impact on future saving behaviour. The Pension Credit also leaves little role for the Second State Pension. As the system is currently proposed, a person could contribute to their second state pension all their working lives, but still be in receipt of means-tested benefit when they retire. Also calls on the government to clarify its plans for the future uprating of the Credit.

TREATING CHILD BENEFIT LIKE DOCKED POCKET MONEY

J. Daley

Daily Telegraph, May 1st 2002, p. 26

Government is considering punishing parents who allow their children to truant by cutting their child benefit. This would mean using state welfare as a means of social control and benefits as a means of behaviour modification. Author concludes that the scheme is harebrained and unworkable.

US EXPERIENCE BODES ILL FOR PLAN TO DOCK BENEFIT

N. Timmins

Financial Times, May 3rd 2002, p. 3

Tony Blair's plan to end school truancy by docking parents' child benefit for their children's non-attendance is unlikely to work if US experience is anything to go by. Various US states have experimented with "learn fare" - a broad US equivalent of the prime minister's proposals - since 1988. The programmes vary markedly, but nowhere are the results dramatic.

YOU READ IT HERE FIRST: FINING PARENTS IS A GOOD IDEA

B. Johnson

Daily Telegraph, May 2nd 2002, p. 29

Argues in support of the government's proposals for punishing the parents of feral children by cutting their welfare benefits.

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