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Welfare Reform on the Web (July 2002): Welfare State - Overseas

DOES ECONOMIC HARDSHIP LEAD TO POLARISATION OF OPINIONS TOWARDS THE WELFARE STATE

P. Forma

Journal of Social Policy, vol. 31, 2002, p. 187-206

Article explores whether the attitudes of the best-off and worst-off towards state welfare diverge during an economic recession using Finland as a case study. Analysis of opinion poll data gathered between 1990 and 1997 suggests that solidarity between better-off and worse-off people in Finland diminished during the recession. High earners became more willing to introduce cutbacks in services and less willing to finance targeted benefits. On the other hand, crisis hit families wished for more support and higher benefits.

THE EUROPEAN SOCIAL POLICY MODEL: PROGRESS SINCE THE EARLY 1980s

F. G. Castles

European Journal of Social Security, vol. 3, 2002 p. 299-313,

Concludes that there is no support for a European social policy model distinct from the wider universe of advanced welfare states. There is however an emerging convergence in the expenditure profile of the countries of Northern Europe. The reminder of the European Union consists of a Mediterranean region which is making patchy progress in catching up to Northern European expenditure norms, and an Anglo-Irish rump which has been reducing its expenditure commitments.

GLOBALIZATION AND SOCIAL POLICY: FROM GLOBAL NEOLIBERAL HEGEMONY TO GLOBAL POLITCAL PLURALISM

N. Yeates

Global Social Policy, vol. 2, 2002, p. 69-91

The article highlights the range of actions taken by states and by their voting, consuming and productive populations at a number of levels (local, national, regional and international) and in a number of spheres (national, transnational, political and economic) to regulate or oppose globalisation. The outcomes of these struggles for social and economic welfare are never certain in advance, but depend, crucially, on the context in which they are negotiated.

POLITICAL THEORIES OF THE WELFARE STATE

J. Myles and J. Quadagno

Social Service Review, vol. 76, 2002, p. 34-57

Article contrasts early debates over the relative importance of industrialisation, economic growth and social class for explaining welfare state differences with contemporary claims about the role of globalisation, post-industrialism and gender relations in shaping their future.

REGIMES OF EXCLUSION

C. Bulpett

European Urban and Regional Studies, vol. 9, 2002, p. 137-149

Article seeks to examine the exclusionary effects of contrasting systems of welfare as manifested within two of Epsing-Andersen's regime categories, the conservative regime of Germany and the liberal regime of the UK. Uses a case study of social housing provision to show how notions of citizenship and the welfare regime characteristics of each country create exclusionary mechanisms. Emphasizes how the exclusionary tendencies evidenced in the case studies demonstrate many of Epsing-Andersen's regime characteristics and show how current policy and its effects are deeply embedded in the overriding political hegemonies.

THE ROLE OF NONPROFIT ASSOCIATIONS IN COMBATING SOCIAL EXCLUSION IN FRANCE

P. Warin

Public Administration and Development, vol. 22, 2002, p. 73-82

Through the fight against the problems of social exclusion and the development of a social urgency field many opportunities have been revealed for partnership between associative/non-profit and public actors in France's social policies.

THE TWO PARADOXES OF WELFARE DEMOCRACY

T. Fitzpatrick

International Journal of Social Welfare, vol. 11, 2002, p. 159-169

Article begins by exploring why discursive democracy is important to social policy, arguing that it is capable of repairing the "democratic deficit" that lies at the heart of the "crisis of universalism". Then proceeds to contrast two philosophies of discursive democracy: proceduralism and pluralism. On the basis of this contrast two paradoxes emerge. The first refers to the need to combine procedural and pluralist theories of deliberative democracy, despite the ultimate irreconcilability of these philosophies. The second refers to the problem of social transition and the fact that democratisation and social equalisation require one another.

THE WELFARE STATE IN TRANSITION ECONOMIES AND ACCESSION TO THE EU

J. J. Wagener

West European Politics, vol. 25, 2002, p. 152-174

Welfare state reform in East-Central Europe can be divided into two phases. In the first phase, when liberalisation, stabilisation and privatisation were of primary importance, only minor or absolutely necessary reform steps were taken. This soon led to fiscal problems in many countries, which triggered the second phase of substantial pension and health system reforms. However transition states were not prepared to adopt the essentially private three pillar model of the World Bank. Instead they have been developing, together with some EU members, a new European four pillar model with a specific public-private mix.

WHO PAYS FOR SOCIAL POLICY? A STUDY ON TAXES AND TRUST

M. Bergman

Journal of Social Policy, vol. 31, 2002, p. 289-305

Study analyses empirical data on the relationship between taxpayer behaviour and individual perception of, and satisfaction with, social policy in Argentina and Chile. These countries have similar tax systems, compatible economic and social development and a similar cultural heritage. However Chile has low levels of tax evasion, while Argentina has high rates of non-compliance. Results suggested a strong association between satisfaction with public services and willingness to pay tax.

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