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Welfare Reform on the Web (August 2002): Social Security - Overseas

ENSURING THE STABILITY OF WELFARE-TO-WORK EXITS: THE IMPORTANCE OF RECIPIENT KNOWLEDGE ABOUT WORK INCENTIVES

S G Anderson

Social Work, vol. 47, 2002, p. 162-170

Personal interviews with 60 welfare recipients in Michigan showed that many did not understand the in-work benefits that would be available to them if they got jobs. They therefore underestimated the advantages of working over welfare.

ISSUES IN IMPLEMENTING TANF IN NEW YORK: THE PERSPECTIVE OF FRONT-LINE WORKERS

J Hagen and J Owens-Manley

Social Work, vol. 47, 2002, p. 171-182

Study examined the perspectives of frontline welfare workers in upstate New York on the implementation of aspects of the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families programme, including exemptions for victims of domestic violence, work requirements, time limits for cash benefits and functions of workers. Social workers were generally positive about the programme, but felt that exemptions open to victims of domestic violence were prone to abuse. They also identified limitations to the employment focused programmes, including restrictions on education and job preparation.

TRANSITIONS FROM AFDC TO SSI BEFORE WELFARE REFORM

D C Stapleton and others

Social Security Bulletin, vol. 64, no. 1, 2001/2002, p. 84-114

Article examines the interaction between the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) programmes in the period immediately before welfare reform. It also discusses the potential impact of welfare reform on the interaction between SSI and the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) programme which replaced AFDC.

THE US STUDY OF WORK INCAPACITY AND REINTEGRATION

P M Wheeler, J R Kearney and C A Harrison

Social Security Bulletin, vol. 64, no. 1, 2001/2002, p. 32-44

Samples for this study were drawn from Disability Insurance (DI) beneficiaries, Supplemental Security Income (SSI) beneficiaries, and Temporary Disability Insurance (TDI) beneficiaries from California and New Jersey. All participants suffered from back disorders. Findings show significant differences between the groups in terms of work resumption and other characteristics. TDI recipients were significantly more likely to return to work, were on average 10 years younger than SSI and DI claimants, were better educated, and reported less physical demands in their usual work. No medical treatment was identified that showed a significantly higher success rate in facilitating a return to work.

HO BENEFITS MOST? THE UNEQUAL ALLOCATION OF TRANSFERS IN THE ISRAELI WELFARE STATE

A C Lewin and H Stier

Social Science Quarterly, vol. 83, 2002, p. 488-503

Study shows that, as in other universal welfare states, Israeli social security policy is effective in reducing poverty, though its impact differs substantially by group membership. It is more effective in aiding recent immigrants, who are entitled to special benefits, than aiding Arabs. Transfers also have a stronger effect in reducing poverty among female- headed families than among couple-headed families, thus reducing the gap between the two types of household.

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