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Welfare Reform on the Web (September 2002): Education - UK - Higher

DEAF STUDENTS AND THEIR SUPPORT IN FURTHER EDUCATION IN THE UNITED KINGDOM: RESULTS FROM THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR TERTIARY EDUCATION FOR DEAF PEOPLE (NATED) SURVEY 2002

R O'Neill and others

Deafness and Education International, vol. 4, 2002, p.99-114

Survey of all further education institutions in the UK revealed increased numbers of deaf students compared to 1991, reflecting current initiatives towards inclusive learning. This increased participation in further education is encouraging, but there is still a wide disparity between colleges in support provision.

ENHANCING EMPLOYABILITY, RECOGNISING DIVERSITY

L Harvey, W Locke and A Morey

London: Universities UK, 2000

Proposes that students should demonstrate that they are employable and have "self-presentation" skills before they are allowed to graduate. Also calls on businesses to provide more work experience placements and allow more of their employees to attend part-time university courses.

LESSONS LEARNED

D Walker

Guardian, July 4th 2002, p.15

Before their elevation to university status in 1992, the polytechnics awarded a range of qualifications up to degree level and were closely linked to local business and culture. Since their metamorphosis, some have suffered a fall in student numbers and prestige and all have lost out to the old universities in the competition for funds.

POST-16 STUDENT SUPPORT

Education and Skills Committee

London: TS0, 2002 (House of Commons papers, session 2001/02; HC 445)

In order to encourage working class students to go to university, report urges a return to means-tested maintenance grants for at least the first year. In order to pay for this, the Committee proposes abolishing low interest student loans that subsidise the better off. They also argue against abolishing means-tested tuition fees, which could even be increased to raise more cash.

STUDENT FEES LIKELY TO INCREASE

W Woodward

Guardian, July 10th 2002, p.5

Reports on radical reforms of UK higher education currently being planned by government. The proposals on the table for consideration include allowing elite universities to charge higher tuition fees, abolition of interest free student loans which favour the better off, and introduction of maintenance allowances for students from poor backgrounds.

STUDENTS IN LOW-INCOME FAMILIES MAY RECEIVE CASH

J Kelly

Financial Times, June 27th 2002, p.4

Government is considering paying university and further education college students a means tested allowance to help them avoid debt. Students might be asked to report to tutors or mentors regularly in return for payments.

TOP-UP FEES CAN HELP UNIVERSITIES FIT AND FOOT THE BILL

J Kelly

Financial Times, July 9th 2002, p.5

Universities could be allowed to demand "top-up" fees despite the government's manifesto commitment not to introduce the extra charges for students. The review of student finance - now delayed until the autumn - may include proposals for the fees. The postponement of publication of the review's findings will raise concerns that ministers are unable to reach agreement.

(See also The Guardian, July 9th 2002, p.1)

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