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Welfare Reform on the Web (September 2002): Social Housing - UK

AFFORDABLE HOUSING AND DEVELOPMENT TAX

P. Clark

Axis, May-June 2002, p.27+17

Government policy favours forcing developers to devote a percentage of each site to affordable housing. Author argues that the need for affordable housing may be exaggerated by stakeholders. Moreover reserving a proportion of all developments for affordable housing accentuates the shortage of housing to buy and inflates prices. Finally, affordable housing delivered through the planning system tends to produce small one and two bedroom units when the need is for more large houses.

CASH REWARD TO IMPROVE BEHAVIOUR BY TENANTS

A. Spackman, and V. Elliott

The Times, July 22nd 2002, p.5

Tenants are to be offered a stake in the value of their homes in return for good behaviour in a scheme being developed by private investors and considered by the Government. The carrot-and-stick approach is part of a strategy to cut the high costs of managing social housing estates, where an average 40p of every pound collected in rents is spent on repairs, maintenance and running costs.

DELIVERING AFFORDABLE HOUSING IN A REFORMED PLANNING SYSTEM

J. Herington

Axis, May/June 2002, p.14

Emphasises the central role of housing needs assessment in increasing the supply of social housing in the context of government's proposed reforms of planning obligations.

HOME IS WHERE THE HARVESTERS USED TO BE

C. Clover

Daily Telegraph, July 18th 2002, p.10

There is now a serious shortage of affordable housing in South East England due to the collapse of council house building in the late 1980s. Government has therefore increased funding for social housing in the Comprehensive Spending Review and proposes relaxing planning restraints to allow building on greenfield sites.

HOUSING CASH GOES INTO NEW TOWNS IN SOUTH

P. Hetherington

The Guardian, July 19th 2002, p.11

Plans for a second generation of new and expanded towns in south-east England capable of providing 200,000 homes were outlined yesterday by John Prescott, mainly on 'brownfield' sites. While northern areas are to get £500m to shore up property confidence.

HOUSING POLICIES: WHERE ARE WE GOING

B. Iddon

Axis, May/June 2002, p.8

Presents a brief analysis of current housing policies and argues for a radical shift away from encouragement of owner occupation towards increased provision of low-rent council housing.

STUDENT HOUSING: A CAUTIONARY TALE OF ONE CITY

D. Hughes and M. Davis

Journal of Social Welfare and Family Law, vol. 24, 2002, p.135-155

Recent statutory instruments have granted exempt landlord status to two commercial providers of student accommodation. There is concern because bodies, which have acquired "exempt" status, are free from constraints of the Housing Act 1998 as regards security of tenure and rent control. Previously, all organisations exempted on the basis of being student landlords have been either charitable, educational or religious institutions or subject to regulations by the Housing Corporation.

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