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Welfare Reform on the Web (September 2002): Social Care - UK

EVALUATION OF THE INTEGRATION OF HEALTH AND SOCIAL SERVICES IN SOMERSET. PART 2, LESSONS FOR OTHER LOCALITIES

P. Gulliver; E. Peck and D. Towell

MCC: Building Knowledge for Integrated Care, vol. 10, June 2002 p. 33-38

In April 1999 Somerset Health Authority and Somerset County Council launched the first fully integrated adult mental health service in England, made up of a joint commissioning board and an integrated services provider. Article presents lessons learned from the Somerset initiative combined with the findings currently available in the research literature and makes recommendations for those involved in building partnerships for the integrated provision of health and social care services.

FAIR ACCESS TO CARE SERVICES: GUIDANCE ON ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA FOR ADULT SOCIAL CARE

Department of Health

London: 2002 (LAC (2002) 13)

Guidance provides councils with a framework for setting their eligibility criteria for adult social care. The framework is based on individuals' needs and associated risks to independence, and includes four eligibility bands: critical, substantial, moderate and low. Guidance stresses that councils should not only identify immediate needs but also needs that would worsen for lack of timely help. The guidance is based on the principle that councils should operate just one eligibility decision for all adults seeking social care, that is, should people be helped or not? Councils should not operate eligibility criteria for type or depths of assessment carried out or for specific services.

IS ANYBODY OUT THERE? RECRUITMENT AND RETENTION IN SOCIAL CARE IN LONDON

A Douglas

Sutton: Community Care, 2002

A long-term workforce planning strategy for health and social care is urgently needed to tackle the severe recruitment crisis in London. Report proposes measures such as:

  • a review of pay and benefits packages for social care staff;
  • media campaigns to promote a positive image of social work in London;
  • provision of affordable housing;
  •  introduction of "care" into the national curriculum;
  • introduction of workforce planning requirements into all social care organisations.

JOINT REVIEWS: RETRACING THE TRAJECTORY, DECODING THE TERMS

J C Humphrey

British Journal of Social Work, vol. 32, 2002, p. 463-476

Joint reviews of local authority social services departments in England and Wales by the Adult Commission and the Social Services Inspectorate were inaugurated in 1996. Article traces the development of Joint Reviews under three successive governments and explores their nature by decoding the meanings of the terms "Joint " and "Review". Argues that Joint Reviews represent a new species of regulation that is intended to synthesise not only all dimensions of accountability (ie performance, financial and political) but also all of its directions (ie to central government, local government and the public)

LONDON CALLING

A Douglas

Community Care, June 20th-26th 2002, p.38-40

Reports on the crisis in social care recruitment in London and suggests ways in which it could be tackled. These include overseas recruitment, a sustained media offensive to promote social work as a career, local determination of pay, improved professional development opportunities, and inducements such as help with housing.

"NO IRISH NEED APPLY": SOCIAL WORK IN BRITAIN AND THE HISTORY AND POLITICS OF EXCLUSIONARY PARADIGMS AND PRACTICES

P.M. Garrett

British Journal of Social Work, vol. 32, 2002, p.477-494

Argues that British social work must develop practices that respond to the needs of the Irish Community as an oppressed ethnic minority.

PERFORMANCE RATINGS FOR SOCIAL SERVICES IN ENGLAND 2001-2002

Social Services Inspectorate

London: DH Publications, 2002

Presents the new "star ratings" for social services departments in England. They have been formulated from evidence from published performance indicators, inspection, Social Services Inspectorate/Audit Commission Joint Reviews, review of plans and in year performance information from both the SSI and the external auditors for each council.

WHY STARS ARE UNDERRATED

D Platt

Community Care, June 27th-July 3rd 2002, p.36-38

Author defends the system of star rating social services departments against detractors who question the evidence on which the ratings are based. Poor performers will be given support to facilitate improvement, while high-performing councils will be rewarded with greater financial freedom and fewer inspections.

(For comment by social services practitioners, see also Community Care, June 27th-July 3rd 2002, p.32-34)

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