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Welfare Reform on the Web (September 2002): Welfare State - UK

CLASS ACCOUNTING

D Walker

Guardian, June 26th 2002, p.13

Most state social spending is allocated to local councils and health organisations on a simple count of heads. Article discusses the feasibility of targeting spending on deprived areas in order to improve the life chances of the poor.

DUNCAN SMITH WON'T BE TIED BY LABOUR PLEDGES

B Brogan

Daily Telegraph, July 10th 2002, p.4

Iain Duncan Smith has confirmed that a future Tory government would not be bound by the Labour government's plans for increased investment in public services, including education. He argues that public services should be reformed before investment is pumped in, and that there is no direct link between levels of investment and outcomes.

(See also Independent, July 10th 2002, p.8; Guardian, July 10th 2002, p.8)

THE FIGURES ARE VAST - BUT CAN THEY MAKE THEM COUNT?

H Young

The Guardian, July 16th 2002, p.1

After the publication of the £61bn spending review the author believes the question remains: how will people notice? Progress will be achingly slow all over the public sector and this is the hardest trick for ministers to learn (with or without spin).

NEW WATCHDOGS SET TO MONITOR PUBLIC SPENDING

J Blitz

Financial Times, July 15th 2002, p.1

New spending watchdogs will be set up today by Gordon Brown when the government attempt the transformation of public services. As the Chancellor announces big increases in spending on education, law and order and defence, the Treasury is preparing to counter Tory accusations of waste by the creation of various watchdogs to monitor spending by housing associations and the police.

(See also The Daily Telegraph, July 15th 2002, p.1; The Guardian, July 15th 2002, p.1)

NHS AMBITIONS COULD ADD 4p TO INCOME TAX

E Crooks and J Blitz

Financial Times, July 10th 2002, p. 4

The public spending plans set out in the Budget show expenditure rising by £20bn a year at today's prices between now and 2005/06. However economists at PWC estimate that if investment in the NHS, education, pensions and long term care is to be sustained into the next Parliament, an extra £12bn a year would be required at today's prices. With little scope for cutting spending in other areas such as defence, the extra expenditure is likely to demand increased taxes.

OPPORTUNITY AND SECURITY FOR ALL: INVESTING IN AN ENTERPRISING, FAIRER BRITAIN: NEW SPENDING PLANS 2003-2006

H M Treasury

London: TSO, 2002 (Cm 5570)

In this Spending Review for 2002, the Chancellors announced that "schools and hospitals first" would be the central government domestic strategy between now and the general election. Health has already used up a third of the extra £61.3bn pledged in the April budget. However the growth in education spending, averaging 7.6 per cent over the next 3 years, will outstrip the rise for the NHS (7.4 per cent). The key points are of the spending review are:

  • public spending to rise from £240bn this year to £301bn by 2005-6
  • cash increases tied to performance and reform
  • education spending to rise by 6 per cent each year for three years
  • transport budget increased
  • Home Office budget up to help in fight against crime
  • biggest house building programme for 25 years
  • science spending to rise by 10 per cent a year

PAY PROTEST TO DISRUPT COUNCIL SERVICES

The Times, July 16th 2002, p.2

The first national strike by council workers since 1979 will affect local authority services including residential care, social services, education, housing, transport, refuse collection, catering and cleaning. More than 1.2 million workers will walk out tomorrow in protest over a 3 per cent pay offer.

PUBLIC - PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS: A UK CASE STUDY

N Deakin

Public Management Review, vol.4, 2002, p.133-147

Article examines partnerships between the state at central and local level and civil society organisations in England, focusing on the work of the Social Exclusion Unit.

UNDERSTANDING SOCIAL EXCLUSION

J Hills (ed) et al

Oxford: OUP 2002

This book examines the causes of social exclusion and the policies needed to tackle it. Based on research by the Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion (CASE) at the London School of Economics, it draws on all aspects of the social sciences, particularly economics, sociology, demography, and area studies.

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