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Welfare Reform on the Web (October 2002): Social Care - UK - Community Care

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R Winchester

Community Care, July 18th-24th 2002, p. 28-30

Article argues that everyone agrees that home care with support is preferable to institutionalised care, but outlooks diverge among health and social care professionals once the front door has been opened and the client crosses the threshold. Article includes example of Staffordshire Social Services implementing care.

DOES THE COVERT NATURE OF CARING PROHIBIT THE DEVELOPMENT OF EFFECTIVE SERVICES FOR YOUNG CARERS?

P Banks and others

British Journal of Guidance and Counselling, vol. 30, 2002. p. 229-246

Presents the findings of a small scale study of young carers in Scotland which focused on their adoption of the caring role, the "hidden" nature of caring, including young people's reluctance to discuss their caring role, the impact of caring on education, and the location and type of support services provided. Goes on to discuss implications for the field of guidance and counselling.

TRANSITIONS TO INFORMAL CARE IN GREAT BRITAIN DURING THE 1990s

M Hirst

Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, vol. 56 Aug 2002, p. 579-587

Based on a longitudinal study of 10,000 adults in 5,000 households across the UK, author estimates that two thirds of women and more than half of men will provide at least 20 hours of informal care per week before they reach the age of 75. Increased involvement in caring arises from trends towards greater longevity, and improvements in the survival chances of severely disabled children. Calls on the government to provide increased funding and support for carers, including flexible working practices to enable them to continue with their jobs and to save for their own old age.

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