Click here to skip to content

Welfare Reform on the Web (October 2002): Community Regeneration and Development - UK

COMMUNITY BUSINESSES - LESSONS FROM LIVERPOOL, UK

K Lemming

Community Development Journal, vol 37, 2002, p. 260-267

On Merseyside, community based economic development (CBED). Strategies have encouraged the development of community businesses. This article compares the community business development experiences of two very different Merseyside communities and the lessons that can be drawn from those experiences.

ETHNIC IDENTITIES, SOCIAL CAPITAL AND HEALTH INEQUALITIES: FACTORS SHAPING AFRICAN-CARIBBEAN PARTICIPATION IN LOCAL COMMUNITY NETWORKS IN THE UK

C. Campbell and C. MacLean

Social Science and Medicine, vol. 55, 2002, p. 643-657

Paper examines the impact of ethnic identities on the likelihood of people's participation in local community networks, drawing on interviews with Afro-Caribbean residents of a small town in the South of England. Levels of participation in voluntary organisations and community activist networks were low. Paper examines the ways in which the construction of ethnic identities, within a context of institutionalised racism, makes it unlikely that people will view local community networks as representative of their interests or needs or be motivated to participate in them. Findings highlight the limitations of policies that simply call for increased community participation by socially excluded groups without specific measures to address the obstacles to such participation.

RE-ASSESSING THE ROLE OF CREDIT UNIONS IN COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT: A CASE STUDY OF DERRY CREDIT UNION, NORTHERN IRELAND

D. Hennan and R. McLaughlin

Community Development Journal, vol 37, 2002, p. 249-259

Against a backdrop of increasing financial debt, it has been suggested community based credit unions are uniquely placed to combat social exclusion and poverty. This case study of a large community based organisation suggests that there is considerable discrepancy between what the organisation claims its contribution is and how the members view its role. It is suggested that the contribution to community development is limited to providing a savings and low cost loans service. Their claim to evoke a community spirit is largely rhetoric. It concludes the credit union movement must re-examine its aims as it is in danger of becoming simply another financial institution.

Search Welfare Reform on the Web