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Welfare Reform on the Web (October 2002): Health Care - Overseas

AN ANALYSIS OF PRIVATE HEALTH INSURANCE PURCHASING DECISIONS WITH NATIONAL HEALTH INSURANCE IN TAIWAN

T.-C. Liu and C.-S. Chen

Social Science and Medicine, vol. 55, 2002, p.755-774

The Taiwanese government included a system of copayments in the national health insurance scheme introduced in 1995 in order to restrain demand. Discusses how this may have encouraged citizens to purchase private health insurance to help cover these copayments. Article analyses data from the 1998 Survey of Family Income and Expenditure to examine the factors influencing the probability and amount of private health insurance purchased.

ENGENDERING INTERNATIONAL HEALTH: THE CHALLENGE OF EQUALITY

G. Sen, A George and P Östlin (eds)

London: MIT Press, 2002. (Basic Bioethics series; vol. 4)

Providing an overview of engendering health equality, this book looks at key areas and examines some research and policy aspects. The key health areas that it identifies are those of communicable diseases, work and its effects on health, violence against women and mental health. The research and policy aspects which it touches on include social discrimination and health; policy environments; class, gender and health equity, gender, burden of disease and priority setting and frameworks for understanding health sector reforms.

EVIDENCE-BASED HEALTH CARE: BENEFITS AND BARRIERS

A. Oliver and D McDaid

Social Policy and Society, vol 1, 2002, p.183-190

Article discusses the use of quantitative evidence in health care decision-making. Barriers include failure of policy makers to understand technical evidence or to use it if politically inconvenient. There is also a danger of evidence being manipulated by professional interest groups.

HEALTH CARE IN THE NEW MILLENIUM: VISION, VALUES, AND LEADERSHI

P

I. Morrison

San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 2002

This book explores health care visions and values. It discusses the leadership challenges faced by health care professionals and looks at the drivers and challenges of change in a global context.

LEARNING ABOUT INTERAGENCY COLLABORATION: TRIALLING COLLABORATIVE PROJECTS BETWEEN HOSPITALS AND COMMUNITY HEALTH SERVICES

H. van Eyk and F. Baum

Health and Social Care in the Community, vol. 10, 2002, p. 262-269

Presents results of an evaluation of the collaborative strategies trialled by a four publicly funded healthcare agencies in Adelaide, South Australia. The four agencies were a large acute care teaching hospital, a domiciliary care and rehabilitation service, a veterans' repatriation hospital, and an integrated health service that incorporates a community hospital and a number of community health services. Concludes that the development of relationships which are either based on trust or on the open negotiation of power differences and professional territories and the management of mistrust are important foundations for achieving greater genuine collaboration between primary and secondary levels of health care.

MEDICAL DOMINANCE IN ITALY: A PARTIAL DECLINE

W. Tousijn

Social Science and Medicine, vol. 55, 2002, p. 733-741

Discusses the impact of health care reform, the rise of consumerism, the breakdown of occupational boundaries, the growth in the number of physicians, and the fragmentation of the medical profession on medical dominance in Italy. Covers the dimensions of control over policymaking, professional regulation, control over other healthcare practitioners, and the ability to create a market for health care services.

SOCIAL AND POLITICAL FACTORS INFLUENCING THE FUNCTIONING OF REGIONAL HEALTH BOARDS IN BRITISH COLUMBIA (CANADA)

C.J. Frankish and others

Health Policy, vol. 61, 2002, p. 125-151

In 1993 British Columbia launched a plan for healthcare reform which mandated the creation of new authorities called Regional Health Boards and Community Health Councils. It was planned that these authorities would govern a health system characterised by greater public participation. The role of the provincial government was confined to setting standards and drawing up guidelines for health care delivery. There has subsequently been considerable debate about the composition of health boards and the role of lay members on them, and their success in addressing the concerns of a broad range of stakeholder groups.

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