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Welfare Reform on the Web (November 2002): Care of the Elderly - UK

CARE MANAGEMENT ARRANGEMENTS FOR OLDER PEOPLE IN ENGLAND: KEY AREAS OF VARIATION IN A NATIONAL STUDY

K. Weiner and others

Ageing and Society, vol. 22, 2002, p. 419-439

It became British government policy in 1989 for local authority social services departments to develop care management systems. Study demonstrates that great variation in care management arrangements exists among local authorities, and suggests that this is partly due to lack of clear guidance. The relative efficiency and effectiveness of the different approaches to care management that are in place, in terms of costs and outcomes for service users and the providing organisations require further investigation.

ELDERLY BRITONS HAVE MORE FUN THAN OTHER EUROPEANS

J. Carvel

Guardian, 6th September 2002, p. 7

Article looks at the figures from research commissioned for a "silver summit" of older Europeans in Rome. It summarises the role of cigarettes, drinking, health services, religion, exercise and luxuries in the lives of the elderly throughout Europe.

INDEPENDENCE AT A PRICE

J. Glasby

Community Care, Aug. 29th - 4th Sept. 2002, p. 30-31

Older people now have a right to receive direct payments from local authorities to enable them to purchase their own care services. Article points out that clients will need access to good information and support to help them cope with these new responsibilities. Some social workers are ambivalent about direct payments, seeing them as a threat. Others lack knowledge of direct payments and have not received adequate training.

THE ROLE OF AGE IN MODERATING ACCESS TO CARDIAC REHABILITATION IN SCOTLAND

A. M. Clark, C. Sharp and P. D. MacIntyre

Ageing and Society, vol. 22, 2002, p. 501-515

Access to health care should be determined by clinical need and not by age. Older people form an increasing proportion of the general population and of those with coronary heat disease, but compared with younger people they are less likely to be invited for cardiac rehabilitation programmes and more likely not to complete them. Study examined the reasons for this trend in Scotland.

THE SOCIAL AND POLITCAL CONTEXT OF FORMAL DEMENTIA CARE PROVISION

A. Innes

Ageing and Society, vol. 22, 2002, p. 483-499

Paper explores the social and political context of formal dementia care provision and considers the implications of recent government reports for the future. Covers definitions of dementia, where people with dementia are cared for and by whom, the costs of care, and reasons for the historically low level of political interest in it in the UK.

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