Click here to skip to content

Welfare Reform on the Web (November 2002): Education - UK - Higher

80% WANT RISE IN UNIVERSITY FUNDING

L. Ward

Guardian, Sept. 2nd 2002, p. 6

A poll conducted for the Association of University Teachers found 80% support for a rise in university funding to finance the government's target of 20% more students by 2010.

IMPROVING STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT AND WIDENING PARTICIPATION IN HIGHER EDUCATION IN ENGLAND

Committee of Public Accounts

London: TSO, 2002 (House of Commons papers, session 2001/02; HC588)

Finds that there is a lack of clarity about the target for widening participation. Definitions have varied over time, and what qualifications count is under review. The basis of measurement has also changed. Raising participation in higher education depends on improving the school performance of pupils from poorer backgrounds. The complexity of the funding system and fear of debt are also barriers to increasing participation.

MINISTER: UNIVERSITIES HAVE TO COMPETE OR CLOSE DOWN

C Gray

Independent, Sept. 10th 2002, p.

Reports government plans for universities to operate in a free market. Institutions able to attract students will be allowed to expand to meet demand, while universities where numbers fall will be forced to close.

(For comment see Financial Times, Sept. 13th 2002, p. 19)

PROMOTING EDUCATION TO IMPROVE MOBILITY

K. Daugirdas

Working Brief, issue 137, 2002, p. 28-31

Summarises research showing links between a good education and upward social mobility, and goes on to discuss the barriers that prevent students from low-income families accessing higher education. The main obstacles appear to be cost and lack of confidence about their ability to succeed. There is also a need to create pathways that enable access to higher education in later life.

STUDENTS WHO PAY THE PRICE ARE PROMISED THEIR JAM TOMORROW

J. Guthrie and E. Crooks

Financial Times, Aug. 22nd 2002, p. 4

The abolition of student maintenance grants and the introduction of tuition fees have led to students leaving university with debts of £10,000 to £15,000.

TEACHING AND LEARNING IN FURTHER EDUCATION: DIVERSITY AND CHANGE

P. Huddleston and L. Unwin

London: Routledge Falmer, 2002-10-21

Focusing on the changing further education environment, this book addresses the diverse nature of the curriculum; teaching and learning strategies; and assessment and continued professional development.

UK INSTITUTIONAL RESPONSES TO UNDERGRADUATES' TERM-TIME WORKING

B. Little

Higher Education, vol. 44, 2002, p. 349-360

Paper looks at two different ways in which higher education institutions in the UK are responding to the situation where in large numbers of undergraduates now work during term-time. One response (that of jobshops) actively assists students in their search for part-time employment. The other seeks to provide opportunities for students to reflect on their experience of work, and help them recognise the learning they may have gained through working.

UNIVERSITIES NEED £10BN TO 'AVOID TUITION FEE INCREASE'

T. Halpin

Times, Sept. 12th 2002, p. 2

Reports on a split amongst universities over whether they should introduce top-up fees in addition to the £1,100 already paid by students in England and Wales. The more popular institutions believe this is the only way to raise the funds needed to protect teaching quality whilst others fear it will deter young people from poorer backgrounds from applying.

(See also Guardian, Sept. 12th 2002, p. 10)

UNIVERSITIES TO LOSE FUNDS FOR BADLY TAUGHT COURSES

J. Clare

Daily Telegraph, Sept. 12th 2002, p. 17

Margaret Hodge, the Education Minister, has told a meeting of vice-chancellors that the government is to stop funding unpopular and poorly taught courses. She laid out some of the key principles underpinning the government's planned reform of higher education and student funding further details of which will be released in November. The first principle is to recognise that all institutions are different; the second is to "enable the market to play a much stronger role in determing student choice and research investment."

(See also Financial Times, Sept. 12th 2002, p. 7)

UNIVERSITIES TO RECEIVE MONEY FOR EXTRA PLACES

S. Cassidy and R. Garner

Independent, Sept. 20th 2002, p. 7

The Education Secretary has promised extra funding to enable universities to admit students whose A-level grades are raised on re-marking so that they meet the entry requirements. Universities have also promised to keep places open next year for any students who find they meet the entry criteria after their A-levels are regarded.

Search Welfare Reform on the Web