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Welfare Reform on the Web (November 2002): Mental Health Services - UK

"CHOICE NOT COMPULSION": OPPOSITION GROWS TO DRACONIAN MENTAL HEALTH BILL

K. Leason

Community Care, Aug. 22nd-28th 2002, p. 20-21

Highlights growing opposition among professional and client groups to the proposals in the draft mental health bill for compulsory detention of patients considered dangerous and compulsory treatment in the community.

COME BACK WHEN YOU'RE REALLY SICK

D. Batty

Guardian, Sept. 13th 2002, p. 17

There has been heavy public investment in provision of secure beds for people with mental health problems who pose a risk to the public. This has diverted funding needed to improve services for the vast majority of low risk patients living in the community.

LEGAL MIND FIELD

D. Carlisle

Health Service Journal, vol. 112, Aug. 29th 2002, p. 14

English law states that doctors alone make the decision to administer medical treatment to patients with diminished mental capacity. Article reports the launch of the Making Decisions Alliance to campaign for a fundamental review of the law. It wants to extend continuing power of attorney to cover decisions about healthcare and welfare, with safeguards to prevent abuse.

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MENTAL HEALTH NEEDS OF YOUNG PEOPLE WITH EMOTIONAL AND BEHAVIOURAL DIFFICULTIES

T. Cole and others

London: Mental Health Foundation, 2002

Argues that the government should do more to promote mental health and pastoral care in schools, especially special schools for pupils with emotional and behavioural difficulties and pupil referral units for those unable to cope in a mainstream school. Recommends that teachers should receive more training in child development and mental health needs. Acknowledges the continuing need for special schools in the medium term, but concludes that government should focus on developing mainstream schools that better understand children's emotional needs in order to reduce the use of these alternative settings in future.

MIND THE GAP

P. McCurry

Community Care, Sept. 5th-11th 2002, p. 28-29

Despite the high incidence of mental illness among adolescents, there is a chronic shortage of both in-patient and community-based services. There is a tendency for those over 16 to disappear into the gap between children's and adults' services. It can also be difficult for mental health professionals to engage with these young people because adolescents shy away from the stigma of receiving services.

NEEDS TO BE LOOKED AFTER

N. Valios

Community Care, Aug. 15th-21st 2002, p. 34-35

Mental health problems are prevalent among children in care. Article points to the need for better training for residential care workers and foster parents and better liaison between those providing general support and specialist mental health services. Preventive and early intervention work is also vital.

A SIGN OF THE TIMES

Department of Health

London: 2002

Consultation on the development of a national strategy for mental health services in England for people of all ages who are Deaf (i.e. whose primary means of communication is British Sign language) or Deaf blind.

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