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Welfare Reform on the Web (August 1999): Child Welfare - Overseas

CHILD PROTECTION: A NEW APPROACH IN SOUTH AUSTRALIA

T. Hetherington
Child Abuse Review, vol.8, 1999, p.120-132

The ever-increasing demand for child protection has sparked a debate in the UK, the US and Australia on the best way to target intervention on those in greatest need. Paper argues that moves towards a new model in the UK and Australia are based on an analysis of the current situation that is somewhat one-dimensional in its focus on children's needs. Presents the case for an integrated approach to the provision of statutory services with a focus on safety and risk issues as well as children's needs and the incorporation of formal assessment instruments. Then gives a brief overview of the new child protection system in South Australia.

IMPROVING CHILD WELFARE THROUGH A CHILDREN'S OMBUDSMAN

R. S. Bearup and V. J. Palusci
Child Abuse and Neglect, vol.23, 1999, p.4449-457

Article examines changes in the child welfare system created by establishing an ombudsman's office in Michigan to investigate complaints regarding children in the foster care, adoption and child protection systems. Concludes that a children's ombudsman can improve the child welfare system through complaint investigation and identification of system-wide deficiencies at state level.

KINSHIP SUPPORT NETWORK: EDGEWOOD'S PROGRAM MODEL AND CLIENT CHARACTERISTICS

J. D. Cohon and B. A. Cooper
Children and Youth Services Review, vol.21, 1999, p.311-338

The Kinship Support Network's case-managed programme reduces gaps in a public welfare system confronting a crisis of rising caseloads, reduced funding, and the need to carry out new legislative mandates. The model presented in the paper exemplifies the privatisation of a public human service programme, using paraprofessionals to facilitate service delivery to relative caregivers.

PRIVATISATION OF FOSTER CARE IN KANSAS: A CAUTIONARY TALE

C. G Petr and I. C. Johnson
Social Work, vol.44, 1999, p.263-267

Describes a small volunteer study of the local effect of state-wide privatisation of foster care services in Kansas. Results showed that children, newly placed in foster care under privatisation, were spending fewer days in their first placement, and were moving between placements on average twice as much as their counterparts in the preprivatisation system. The privatised system had about the same success rate as the old system in reuniting children with their families.

TRANSFORMING ADOPTION IN THE 'NEW' SOUTH AFRICA IN RESPONSE TO THE HIV/AIDS EPIDEMIC

M. Harber
Adoption and Fostering, vol.23, 1999, p.6-15

Article presents the results of research on the dilemmas faced by, and achievements of, one child welfare agency as it attempted to adapt the Western model of adoption prevalent in South Africa in order to create a more appropriate service for black South African children.

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