Click here to skip to content

Welfare Reform on the Web (August 1999): Child Welfare - UK

DISABLED CHILDREN, CHILD PROTECTION SYSTEMS AND THE CHILDREN ACT 1989

J. Morris
Child Abuse Review, vol.8, 1999, p.91-108

Article discusses research on the implementation of the Children Act as it applies to disabled children and the findings from in-depth interviews with young disabled people. Results show that current child protection systems are not addressing the needs of disabled children; the Children Act regulations on short- and long-term placements are often not complied with; and disabled children and young people have little say in decisions that affect them.

GROWING STRONG

J. Hirst
Community Care, no.1272, 1999, p.18-19

Discusses factors which put children's emotional and mental well-being at risk, and those which, conversely, make them more resilient to adversity. Factors which put children's mental health at risk are well known and include poverty and social deprivation, low IQ, experience of abuse, parental mental illness or alcoholism, family breakdown and bereavement. On the other hand, close attachments to one or two significant adults (not necessarily parents) promote resilience. Social policy may promote resilience, as in the Quality Protects targets for reducing the number of placements for children in care, or damage it, as in high rise housing which broke up support networks and left families isolated.

HELP'S AT HAND

J. Snell
Guardian. Society, May 19th 1999, p.8-9

Prospects for about 1.25 million children living in poverty could be radically improved if affordable care enabled their mothers to work. Article looks at the flood of projects ushering in the childcare revolution brought about by the government's National Childcare Strategy.

IMPROVING THE HEALTH OF CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE LEAVING CARE

B. Broad
Adoption and Fostering, vol.23, 1999, p.40-48

Presents the main findings of a research project on the health needs of young people leaving care. Concludes that ways need to be found of reducing the emotional harm done by being in care, of encouraging young people to look beyond day-to-day survival, of reducing the need for young people to have less than healthy lifestyles as a way of releasing stress, of countering the isolation and unhappiness arising from living alone in poor accommodation, and of assisting professionals in becoming much more responsive and user friendly.

KINSHIP CARE: CHILDREN PLACED WITH EXTENDED FAMILIES OR FRIENDS

B. Broad
Childright, no.155, 1999, p.16-17

Concludes that where it is not feasible for children to live with their birth parents, local authorities should be encouraged to work with families to explore the option of placement within their extended family. The advantages of such arrangements include maintaining continuity of care, supporting on-going relationships, encouraging family responsibility and support, and helping to maintain the cultural identities of children.

THE MENTAL HEALTH PROBLEMS OF CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE

H. Kay
Childright, no.155, 1999, p.9-11

Summarises and discusses the results of the Mental Health Foundation's inquiry into the mental health problems of children and young people. Covers incidence of mental health problems, risk and resilience factors, policies and programmes (including promotion of emotional well-being and early intervention) and the financial costs of developing services to tackle the problems.

THE ROLE OF SELF-ASSESSMENT IN THE REGULATION AND INSPECTION OF GROUP DAY CARE

A. Mooney and A. G. Munton
Children and Society, vol.13, 1999, p.95-105

Paper considers the role of self-assessment in maintaining and improving standards of day care. A pilot study designed to investigate and develop the potential contribution of self-assessment procedures in the regulation of day nurseries is described. Results suggest that self-assessment incorporated with inspection and development work offers a means by which providers and inspectors can work together to improve standards.

STILL SCREAMING: BIRTH PARENTS COMPULSORILY SEPARATED FROM THEIR CHILDREN

L. Charlton and others
Manchester: After Adoption, 1998

Describes the work of two small innovative projects which aim to serve this disenfranchised group and gives voice to their experiences with social work professionals and at the hands of society at large.

YOUNG PEOPLE LEAVING CARE: MOVING TOWARDS 'JOINED UP' SOLUTIONS

B. Broad
Children and Society, vol.13, 1999, p.81-93

The problems of young people leaving care are considerable in comparison with those faced by teenagers living in the parental home, and are further complicated by the unstable situation which led to their being put in care in the first place. It is argued that the 'guidance and standards' approach offered by the Department of Health cannot on its own solve the problems faced by young people leaving care. Instead 'joined up' responses by national and local government and voluntary organisations together with involvement of the young people themselves are necessary.

Search Welfare Reform on the Web