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Welfare Reform on the Web (August 1999): Education - UK - Training

CHAMBERS OF COMMERCE BID FOR TECS' TRAINING ROLE

A. Pike
Financial Times, May 5th 1999, p.15

British Chambers of Commerce, in its response to the governments' review of training, advocates combining the enterprise functions of Tecs and the Business Links Advisory Service with chambers of commerce to create strong "new chambers". These would have the leading role in representing business interests in 50 new local learning and skills councils which the BCC believes should plan, monitor and promote training in England.

DON'T THROW IT ALL AWAY

I. MacKinnon
People Management, vol.8, April 22nd 1999, p.29

Makes a case for the retention of Training and Enterprise Councils on the grounds that they have been highly successful in engaging the interest and participation of business people.

EMPLOYERS AND COLLEGES JOSTLE OVER TEC REVIEW

M. Whitehead
People Management, vol.8, April 22nd 1999, p.14

The Tec National Council proposes that new local bodies consisting of employer, trade union and voluntary sector representatives should be set up to purchase education and training from colleges, school sixth forms, voluntary and commercial organisations. The Association of Colleges says Tecs should be abolished and be replaced by local learning partnerships representing industry, education and local authorities, which would bid for money from central government and allocate it to local priorities.

LIFELONG LEARNING: A PRACTITIONER PERSPECTIVE

R. Johnson
Education and Training, vol.41, 1999, p.56-62

Paper gives an account of a focus group set up to discuss, and respond to, the DfEE green paper 'The Learning Age'. The focus group applauded the ethos and ideology of 'The Learning Age', the principle of the University for Industry and the suggestions about workplace learning. It expressed reservations about funding, access by the low skilled and poorly educated, the proliferation of agencies to be involved and the burden of the proposed bureaucratic structure.

TRAINING REFORMS MAY SPUR REVOLT ON NEW DEAL FOR JOBS

A. Pike
Financial Times, May 24th 1999, p.18

Reports business leaders' reservations about the government's proposed new training regime. Proposals would introduce a simplified funding structure under a national agency evolved from the existing Further Education Funding Council. A continuing role in skills strategy for renamed Training and Enterprise Councils is likely, but the Tecs have not yet won a battle to retain business support and economic development responsibilities. Business leaders are concerned that the plans would allow colleges too much freedom to decide which courses to offer, with insufficient private sector influence, that business input into decision-making would be concentrated on national and regional skills planning bodies rather than on local labour markets, and that loss of the Tecs' enterprise functions would introduce an artificial distinction between training and other business support programmes and would weaken local partnerships.

UNION HEAD CLASHES WITH MINISTER OVER SKILLS LEVY

J. Robinson
Personnel Today, April 19th 1999, p.15

Reports clash of views on whether or not a compulsory training levy on employers is required to improve the UK's lamentable record on training.

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