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Welfare Reform on the Web (August 1999): Social Security - UK - New Deal

BLACK PEOPLE ARE LET DOWN BY NEW DEAL

M Whitehead
People Management, vol. 5, April 22nd 1999, p. 11

New figures from the DfEE show that young black people are getting a poor deal compared with whites under the government's flagship welfare-to-work programme.

DEALERS' CHOICE

S. Overell
Personnel Today, May 13th 1999, p. 30-32

Reports that basic goodwill from employers towards the New Deal for the Young Unemployed is still in place a year after its launch. Main complaints are about the low skills levels of the candidates and the slowness of the system. To make the New Deal work, a combination of senior management support and close communication with the Employment Service is required.

DESTINATION UNKNOWN: ENGAGING WITH PROBLEMS OF MARGINALISED YOUTH

T. Bentley and R. Gurumurthy
London: Demos, 1999.

Independent study of the New Deal reveals that for each person aged between 16 and 24 claiming benefit, another is jobless, not in training or education and missing from official statistics. Missing youngsters include: as many as 272,000 mothers or carers, an estimated 131,000 young people who have left school, but are not in training or at work, and have no benefits, as many as 65,000 missing for no known reason, and 32,000 in part-time study. Demos recommends the creation of voluntary and private locally based information networks. These would target young people at risk and develop an employment brokerage system.

(For comment see Times, May 18th 1999, p. 20)

MEASURE TO JUDGE NEW DEAL ALTERED

D. Hammond
Personnel Today, April 29th 1999, p. 4

The government will use the claimant count to assess the New Deal, following an announcement by the Office for National Statistics that it is no longer able to correct seasonal variations in unemployment among the 18-24 age group.

NEW DEAL SENDS A SIGNAL OF HOPE TO THE RURAL UNEMPLOYED

S. Buckby
Financial Times, May 11th 1999, p. 12

The Employment Service in Hereford and Worcester has begun applying imaginative solutions to aid job seekers in rural areas. The Service has begun renting out mopeds and bicycles and paying for driving lessons and car insurance to overcome transport problems, and has been trying to brigade small businesses together so that they can share New Dealers.

NEW PACKAGING, OLD DEAL? NEW LABOUR AND EMPLOYMENT POLICY INNOVATION

J. Tonge
Critical Social Policy, vol. 19, 1999, p. 217-232

Labour's New Deal represents policy continuity between governments. Active employment policy is based on training/job creation schemes and employment subsidies. It is increasingly coercive, representing policy continuity from the Thatcher-Major era. Welfare-to-work is based on the use of benefits sanctions for an increased number of unemployed persons declining 'suitable' employment or training. The revival of 1970s style subsidies promotes these policies to employers, helping 'sell' the jobless.

PARTNERS OF JOBLESS FORCED TO SEEK WORK

P. Waugh
Independent, May 7th 1999, p. 16

Under one of the provisions of the Welfare Reform and Pensions Bill, dependent wives and girl-friends of jobless young men aged 18-24 would be forced to look for work. Childless couples in this age bracket would be forced to make a joint claim for Jobseekers' Allowance or risk losing benefit and would be required to join the New Deal for the Young Unemployed after six months.

PRIVATE FIRMS FAIL NEW DEAL

C. Denny
Guardian, May 17th 1999, p. 21

Private sector job agencies contracted to manage the Gateway phase of the New Deal have among the lowest rates of success in getting clients into work. Although only 10 of the 144 centres have been contracted out to the private sector, they are among the worst performers in the country.

TOUGH PLANS FOR 'WORKSHY' YOUTHS

P. Waugh
Independent, May 20th 1999, p. 12

Reports government plans to withdraw benefit from jobless under-25s who refuse to work or train under the New Deal. Benefit will be stopped for six months rather than four weeks as now.

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