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Welfare Reform on the Web (December 2002): Care of the Elderly - UK

  • CARE HOMES FOR OLDER PEOPLE AND YOUNGER ADULTS: CONSULTATION DOCUMENT (PDF format)

    Department of Health

    London : 2002

    Consultation document on proposals to amend environmental National Minimum Standards care homes for older people and younger adults. The amended standards will apply to care homes in existence before April 1st 2002 and effectively abolish the new requirements on room sizes, shared rooms, doorways, lifts and assisted baths. Where such homes do not meet standards set for newly registered homes, they must specify details of their accommodation in their statement of purpose and user guide.

    (For comment see Caring Times, Oct. 2002, p. 8)

    CARE MANAGEMENT AND SOCIAL WORK: A CASE STUDY OF THE ROLE OF SOCIAL WORK IN HOSPITAL DISCHARGE TO RESIDENTIAL OR NURSING HOME CARE

    J. Phillips and J. Waterson

    European Journal of Social Work, vol. 5, 2002, p. 171-186

    Argues that legislative changes since 1990 to health and social care for older people in England and Wales have had a major impact on social work roles and tasks. Since 1990 the primary emphasis on managerialism in social work has changed the roles and tasks that social workers carry out at the interface of the health and social care systems. There is a less emphasis on provision of informational and emotional support to clients and more on the administrative functions of care management.

    THE CARING IN LATER LIFE REPORT: A SECONDARY ANALYSIS OF THE 1995 GENERAL HOUSEHOLD SURVEY.

    A. Milne and E. Hatzidimitriadou

    Quality in Ageing, Vol. 3, Sept 2002, p. 3-15

    Analysis of the General Household Survey data for 1995 makes it clear that there are increasing numbers of older carers, and that they form a rising percentage of the total number of carers. Older carers can be distinguished from other groups in a variety of ways: they are more likely to live with the person they care for, caring is more likely to take place within a long term relationship and there is a greater chance of their having health problems of their own. Dementia is also more likely to be a feature of caring in later life. Co-resident older carers often provide intensive care over a long period of time in very demanding circumstances with little or no support from services. Most of these carers are spouses.

    OLDER PEOPLE WANT MORE

    J. McTernan

    Community Care, Sept. 19th-25th 2002, p. 37-38

    As the population ages, older people are set to become more influential politically. They are likely to use their new political muscle to demand improved pensions and better welfare provision, including free personal care.

    PAYING FOR OLD AGE: CAN PEOPLE ON LOWER INCOMES AFFORD DOMICILIARY CARE COSTS?

    C. Deeming and J. Keen

    Social Policy and Administration, vol. 36, 2002, p. 465-481

    Evidence about peoples' willingness and ability to save and pay for long-term care is scanty. Accordingly an interview survey of 100 people - Today's and Tomorrow's Pensioners - was undertaken which suggests today's pensioners on average and lower incomes are experiencing difficulties in paying for care services in their own homes. The results support the view that people overestimate their retirement incomes and think that government can and should pay for long-terms care.

    THE PIVOT GENERATION: INFORMAL CARE AND WORK AFTER FIFTY

    A. Mooney and J. Statham

    Bristol: Policy Press, 2002

    Staff over 50 can increasingly expect to find themselves under pressure from employers to stay on in full time work and under simultaneous pressure from families to care for either elderly parents or grandchildren or both . Without more resources to support them, in and out of work, their contribution may not be sustainable.

  • THE RESIDENTIAL CARE AND NURSING HOME SECTOR FOR OLDER PEOPLE: AN ANALYSIS OF PAST TRENDS, CURRENT AND FUTURE DEMAND

    Department of Health

    2002

    Study aimed to examine the factors affecting the supply of care homes for older people, future demand including alternative forms of care, and to assess ways of ensuring adequate future supply.

    TAKING CARE OF LATER LIFE: A MATTER OF JUSTICE?

    J. Johnson

    British Journal of Social Work, vol. 32, 2002, p. 739-750

    Paper reviews current policies and practices in the UK regarding the provision of long-term care for older people, focusing on residential and nursing home care, charging for care, and the shifting boundary between health and social care. Argues that these policies are incompatible with social justice. Over the past 50 years the older generation has invested heavily in the welfare state. The security and well-being of those in need of long-term care is now, however, being threatened by its marketization and commodification.

    WHAT DETERMINES THE USE OF HOME CARE SERVICES BY ELDERLY PEOPLE?

    H. Stoddart and others

    Health and Social Care in the Community, vol. 10, 2002, p. 348-360

    Study investigated the determinants of use of statutory and private home care services by a sample of 2000 elderly people living in the community in Bristol. Increasing age, not owning a car, and being a widow(er) were associated with greater use of both statutory and private home care services, as was worse self-reported overall health. Older age on leaving full time education was associated with increased use of private services. For women, leakage of urine was associated with greater use of private services. Problems with eyesight were determinants for use of both types of home care services for women, but only private services for men.

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