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Welfare Reform on the Web (January 2003): Community Regeneration and Development - UK

COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT IN RURAL REGENERATION PARTNERSHIPS IN THE UK : EVIDENCE FROM ENGLAND, NORTHERN IRELAND AND SCOTLAND

S. P. Osborne, R. S. Beattie and A. P. Williamson

Bristol: Policy Press, 2002

Study sought to assess the nature, impact and process of community involvement in rural partnerships in the different national contexts of England, Scotland and Northern Ireland. Found that rural regeneration partnerships operate at strategic, intermediate and community levels. There was lack of involvement at the strategic level. Few community representatives had a formal mandate from their communities. Transport and communication difficulties and low population densities acted as barriers to effective participation. Local voluntary and community infrastructure was crucial to the effectiveness of involvement.

INITIATIVES MUST INVOLVE LOCAL PEOPLE IN RENEWAL, SAY COMMUNITY GROUPS.

A.U. Sale

Community Care, Nov. 7th-13th 2002, p. 18-19

Summarises written evidence presented to the House of Commons Sub-Committee on Urban Affairs on the operation and impact of regeneration schemes. Evidence emphasises the need for local community involvement in regeneration schemes and raises concerns about changes to funding, particularly the abolition of the single regeneration budget. This will be replaced by a single post of money administered by Regional Development Agencies.

TIME ON OUR SIDE: TIME BANKS AND ACTIVE CITIZENSHIP

G. Seyfang

New Economy, vol. 9, 2002, p. 242-247

Time banks reward community participation or help for neighbours with time credits which can be spent on services from other participants. Time banks encourage socially excluded groups to get involved in volunteering, and have also been proven to build capacity for community self-help. At the individual level, they build social capital particularly through the growth of social networks and friendships.

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