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Welfare Reform on the Web (January 2003): Education - UK - Training

COMPETENCE-BASED TRAINING, VOCATIONAL QUALIFICATIONS AND LEARNING TARGETS: SOME LESSONS FOR THE LEARNING AND SKILLS COUNCIL

H Matlay and M Addis

Education and Training, vol. 44, 2002, p.250-260

Discusses the views of employers and employees on National and Scottish Vocational Qualifications (N/SVQs) focusing on their role in company training systems and small business. Concludes that the take-up of competence-based N/SVQs has peaked in larger organisations and has declined in small business. The Learning and Skills Council needs to stimulate both employer and employee demand for N/SVQs as this is essential if the revised national targets are to be met.

INDIVIDUAL LEARNING ACCOUNTS

National Audit Office

London: TSO, 2002 (House of Commons papers, session 2001/02; HC 1235)

The Individual Learning Accounts scheme in England was closed in November 2001 on police advice following allegations of large scale fraud. Problems arose due to:

  • inadequate planning and monitoring;
  • failure to actively manage the risk of fraud;
  • failure to share risk with Capita, the contractor running the scheme.

LANDSCAPES OF LEARNING: LIFELONG LEARNING IN RURAL COMMUNITIES

F Gray (ed)

Leicester: National Institute of Adult Continuing Education, 2002

Looking at lifelong learning in rural communities, this book reflects on the wider social context. It covers social change, political and economic transformation, the nature of rural society, social exclusion in the countryside and policy formation and implementation. It uses case studies to illustrate how these issues can be overcome.

web link

LEARNING AND SKILLS COUNCIL AND LEARNING PARTNERSHIPS NATIONAL POLICY FRAMEWORK : FINAL DRAFT

Department for Education and Skills

2002

Framework outlines the strategic role of learning partnerships (LPs) and offers guidance on the relationship between the Learning and Skills Council and LPs.

LECTURERS' PAY STRIKE CLOSES 40 COLLEGES

W Woodward

The Guardian, November 6th 2002, p.7

Lecturers and support staff in England closed around 40 further education colleges in strike action in protest at a 2.3% pay offer.

(See also Financial Times, November 6th 2002, p.5)

ON THE UPGRADING OF VOCATIONAL STUDIES : ANALYSING PREJUDICE AND SUBORDINATION IN ENGLISH EDUCATION

T Hyland

Educational Review, vol. 54, 2002, p.287-296

There are deep-seated prejudices against vocational education in England. In spite of thirty years of continuous reform, the problems remain. The latest solutions linked to the reorganisation of 14-19 education represent the same tinkering with labels and tracks characteristic of previous failed experiments. Until a new philosophical infrastructure for vocational education is established and used to underpin reform, the problems surrounding its subordinate status will remain.

SUPPORTING ADULT LEARNING: WHAT DOES THE GOVERNMENT WANT TO ACHIEVE?

M Corney

New Economy, vol. 9, 2002, p.236-241

The UK government has launched a raft of adult education initiatives, but has not identified its primary objectives. Article goes on to look at the range of available options for funding adult education. Finally focuses on a particular initiative, the Employer Training Pilots in England. These will offer adults free tuition/accreditation to achieve a first Level 2 qualification. They will also provide paid time off to low qualified adult employees.

THE THIRD "E"

C Ryan

Public Finance, Nov 15th-21st 2002, p.16-18

Further education colleges have not shared in the extra funding pumped into education by central government. This is leading to widespread dissatisfaction among lecturers with their pay. Funding is now distributed to colleges by national and local Learning and Skills Councils. There is concern that they are keeping too much money back for administration, and that funds allocated come with too many strings attached.

WORKING ARRANGEMENTS

T Lloyd

Young People Now, Nov 2002, p.24-25

Describes a successful project aimed at preparing socially excluded young men for the workplace. The programme consisted of school-based sessions covering job interviews, completion of application forms and CVs, how to look for a job, and training options. There were also visits to local workplaces, a college, the job centre and the careers office.

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