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Welfare Reform on the Web (March 2003): Education - UK - Training

BVOC AND MVOC: A WAY FORWARD FOR HIGHER LEVEL NVQs IN MANAGEMENT

S. Wilkins

Human Resource Development International, vol. 5, 2002, p.425-445

Discusses and analyses the implementation of higher level National Vocational Qualifications in management. Assesses the concept of use and exchange value, the extent of individual development achieved, problems in attracting applicants, support required by candidates, reasons for low completion rates, the need for external assessment and how NVQs relate to academic qualifications. Proposes the development of new higher level NVQs that would both develop and test theoretical knowledge and assess competence in the workplace. Argues that universities should have a role in the redesign of higher level NVQs and that they should become the awarding bodies.

THE END OF TECS: A CHALLENGE FOR PARTNERS AND SUCCESSOR BODIES TO MAINTAIN DISCRETIONARY ACTIVITY

M. Ramsden, R.J. Bennett and C. Fuller

Policy Studies, vol. 23, 2002, p. 231-246

Discretionary activity among Training and Enterprise Councils (TECs) cost about £200m per year at its peak in 2000. It included economic development, business support and workforce development. TECs were abolished in April 2001. Paper examines the challenges faced by the successor bodies (Learning and Skills Council, Regional Development Agencies, and the Small Business Service) in maintaining significant local initiatives.

THE ENGLISH VOCATIONAL EDUCATION AND TRAINING POLICY DEBATE: FRAGILE "TECHNOLOGIES" OR OPENING THE "BLACK BOX": TWO COMPETING VISIONS OF WHERE WE GO NEXT.

E. Keep

Journal of Education and Work, vol 15, 2002, p. 457-479

Article sets out two competing models for English vocational education and training (VET) policy. The first revolves around a range of supply-side solutions that are dependent on mangerial techniques such as target-setting and financial incentives. This model has led to the creation of the new Learning and Skills Council and its statutory duty to set and pursue a fresh set of national learning targets. The second approach seeks to integrate skills issues into wider concerns about competitive strategies, labour market regulation, work organisation and job design. Policy-makers need to try and create within firms an environment that is both rich in its potential for learning and demands and uses high levels of skills in the productive process.

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