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Welfare Reform on the Web (April 2003): Education - UK - Higher

£3,000 TOP-UP FEES ARE 'JUST THE START', UNIVERSITIES WARN

R Garner

Guardian, February 13th 2003, p.2

Universities will press for an increase in the new top-up fees of £3,000 a year because of a growing funding crisis. Universities UK, be body representing vice-chancellors, believes the £3,000 a year for students will be just the starting point for charges.

AND STILL THEY F**K YOU UP

K Coxon

Guardian Education, February 25th 2003, p.12-13

Article asks what happens if a student's parents refuse to make any contribution to tuition fees and living costs?

CLARKE FUELS ROW OVER UNIVERSITY ACCESS

R Smithers

Guardian, Feb. 26th 2003, p.9

Discusses controversy over discrimination by universities such as Bristol and Edinburgh against well-qualified applicants from private schools and in favour of young people from deprived backgrounds with low A-level grades. Government appears to support this approach.

LANGUAGE STUDY "JUST FOR THE ELITE"

W Woodward

Guardian, Feb. 20th 2003, p.13

Reports that the numbers of students taking language degrees have fallen from 10,400 to 8,000 over five years. The drop has been a key cause of the shortage of language teachers in schools. At school, numbers taking languages at A level have declined with candidates increasingly coming from public schools.

NO CLASS REGULATOR

J Crace

Guardian Education, February 4th 2003, p.15

POOREST STUDENTS MAY BE SPARED TUITION FEES

G Owen

Times, Feb. 20th 2003, p.2

Students from low-income families may be exempted from the government's proposed £3,000 a year university tuition fees.

TOP RESEARCH-LED UNIVERSITIES CALL ON MPs TO REVISE FUNDING PROPOSAL

J Kelly

Financial Times, Feb. 21st 2003, p.3

Government is planning to fund new universities (ex-Polytechnics) to work more closely with business through "knowledge transfer". They want these universities to help solve "real world problems" by offering consultancy services. This has annoyed leading research institutions who claim that they also engage in "knowledge transfer".

TORIES ATTACK CULTURE OF EQUALITY IN EDUCATION

K Guha

Financial Times, February 4th 2003, p.4

Iain Duncan Smith delivered an attack on the culture of "egalitarianism" in education. His comments, in a speech to the Bow Group think-tank, came as the Tories said they would scrap the government's new university access regulator.

(See also The Times, February 4th 2003, p.8)

UNIVERSITIES TO ASK: HOW DISADVANTAGED ARE YOU?

J Clare

The Daily Telegraph, February 17th 2003, p.6

Universities are planning to ask applicants to demonstrate how disadvantaged they are before offering them a place. From 2005, applicants would have to declare on Ucas forms how educated their parents were and how much they earned. At present, admissions tutors know only applicant's names, addresses, school, GCSE results and predicted grades.

UNIVERSITY TO FAVOUR APPLICANTS FROM LESS ACADEMIC BACKGROUNDS

J Kelly

Financial Times, February 19th 2003, p.4

Edinburgh University is to give preference to candidates whose parents did not get a degree or who apply from schools with a poor exam record. It is the most high profile response yet to the government's call for places at university to be awarded on the basis of a broader "portfolio" than exam results.

(See also The Daily Telegraph, February 19th 2003, p.1)

UNIVERSITIES TO LEVY FEES BEFORE ACCESS DEAL

A Perkins

The Guardian, February 11th 2003, p.11

All Britain's top universities are expected to get the go-ahead to levy variable fees from 2006. Margaret Hodge, the Higher Education Minister, confirmed that there would not be time for a new regulator to judge how effective a university's access policies were before the first funding decisions were made.

UNIVERSITIES WARNED OVER CREATION OF FEES CARTEL

J Kelly and K Guha

Financial Times, February 26th 2003, p.6

In a wide ranging interview the Education Secretary, Charles Clarke, discusses possible collusion between universities in setting top-up fee levels, the future of grammar schools, capital investment in schools, and co-operation between education and business.

WIDENING ACCESS AND PARTICIPATION IN UK HIGHER EDUCATION

D. Tonks and M Farr

International Journal of Educational Management, vol.17, 2003, p.26-36

Authors define "access" as the overall representation of the population of interest (young people resident in the UK) in higher education (HE). "Participation" concerns the extent to which sub-groups of young people are represented in different universities and subject fields. "Participation" in HE will only widen if the growth in applications to HE from deprived neighbourhoods is directed towards a range of subjects at all universities. Existing financial incentives for UK universities encourage acceptance of applicants from poor areas overall but do not address issues of "participation".

WORKING ALL THE TIME: STUDENT INCOMES AND EMPLOYMENT

H Christie, M Munro and H Rettig

Youth and Policy, no.78, 2002/03, p.1-25

Students are increasingly likely to engage in paid work during term time. Research used structured interviews with 49 students in Edinburgh to explore the family processes and personal lifestyle choices underlying the decision to work.

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