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Welfare Reform on the Web (April 2003): Social Housing - UK

AFFORDABLE HOUSING

Housing, Planning, Local Government and the Regions Committee

London: TSO, 2003 (House of Commons papers session 2002/03; HC75)

There is a shortage of affordable housing in the South of England. Remedial measures recommended include:

  • limitations on tenants' right to buy council houses;
  • promotion of low cost home ownership schemes;
  • measures to release brownfield sites for building;
  • encouragement of mixed tenure developments.

ARE HOUSING ORGANISATIONS BECOMING LEARNING ORGANISATIONS? SOME LESSONS FROM THE MANAGEMENT OF TENANT PARTICIPATION

B Reid and P Hickman

Housing Studies, vol. 17, 2002, p.895-918

Paper deals with links between organisational development in social housing organisations and tenant participation, and asks whether social housing organisations through such practices can be said to be adopting some of the features of learning organisations. Discusses the ways in which tenant participation arrangements can serve as conduits for organisational learning, prompting organisational adaptation and change.

BETWEEN SOCIAL HOUSING AND THE MARKET: DEVELOPING AND MANAGING MARKET RENTING SCHEMES BY HOUSING ASSOCIATIONS

B Goodchild and P Syms

Coventry: Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors, 2003

The renting of homes at market rents by housing associations is an important means of meeting housing need. The core client group for this property comprises young professionals on average incomes. Market renting schemes have potential for expansion but are currently constrained by the regulatory framework of the Housing Corporation.

COUNCIL HOUSE POLICY IN CHAOS

Anon

Labour Research, vol. 92, Feb. 2003, p.17-18

Tenants are increasingly rejecting plans by councils to transfer their homes wholesale to registered social landlords. As many of the rejected schemes relate to decaying estates in urban areas, this rebellion is putting in jeopardy government targets for raising all public housing to a minimum standard by 2010.

DRASTIC SURGERY FOR ENGLAND'S LANDSCAPE

H Morris

Axis, Jan./Feb. 2003, p.10-13

Presents a critique of the government's Sustainable Communities Plan, which promises 200,000 new homes in the South-East. There is concern that the need to develop the transport system to support such a rise in the local population is not being addressed. The proposals to establish regional housing boards to prepare strategies and advise ministers has annoyed the Local Government Association as county councils will not be represented.

EVALUATION OF THE LOW COST HOME OWNERSHIP PROGRAMME

Office of the Deputy Prime Minister and Welsh Assembly.

Rotherham: 2003

Low cost home ownership (LCHO) in England and Wales fell from its high point in 1994/95 to a low in 1999/2000. In 2000/01, 2,400 low cost homes were provided, but research suggests annual demand could exceed 30,000 households. For most planners, LCHO is a compromise solution arrived at through negotiation with private developers, using section 106 agreements. LCHO plays an important role in regeneration schemes, especially when these involve the redevelopment of large scale estates. Most councils award LCHO lower priority than social renting, but the needs of key workers may change this stance.

FREEDOM FOR THE FEW IN HOUSING SHAKE-UP

N Merrick

Public Finance, Feb. 14th-20th 2003, p.14

There is a proposal in the Sustainable Communities Plan to allow high performing Arms Length Management Organisations to leave the housing subsidy system and become self-financing. They would be allowed to borrow money on the financial markets to repair rundown housing.

GRANT AXE HITS CHEAP HOUSING SCHEMES

P Hetherington

Guardian, Feb. 25th 2003, p.8

Grants worth £1.3bn over the next two years which were to be used by local authorities to fund building through housing associations have been scrapped at seven weeks notice. As a result at least 14,000 proposed affordable homes may never be built.

A MATTER OF TIME

S Wilcox

Axis, Jan./Feb. 2003, p.16-17

Discusses the impact of new Treasury rules on public borrowing. The changes will bring about a reappraisal of key areas of housing policy. They should break the culture of short termism in social housing provision; favour the building of more social housing; favour conventional public sector investment and stock retention by local authorities; be less favourable to stock transfer and PFI schemes; and lead to higher housing association grant rates and lower rents.

A NEW MARKET FORCE TO BE RECKONED WITH

J Cowans

Axis, Jan./Feb. 2003, p.14-15

There is a growing demand for quality rented housing for young, single, professional people. Housing associations are extremely well placed to provide this type of accommodation.

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