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Welfare Reform on the Web (April 2003): Mental Mental Health Services - UK

BE A GATEWAY TO BETTER MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES

A. Cohen

Primary Care Report, vol. 5, Feb. 5th 2003, p. 35-36

Primary care trusts need to look at innovative ways of deploying the primary care workforce, including practice nurses, to ensure better support for people with common mental health problems. The also need to forge strong links with social services and secondary mental health services to improve the care of patients with more complex problems.

CONSTRUCTING MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES FOR LOOKED AFTER CHILDREN

E. Street and M. Davies

Adoption and Fostering, vol. 26, Winter 2002, p. 65-75

Paper argues that there is a clear lack of integration of models of good practice among childcare and mental health professionals working with children in local authority care. Authors advocate a developmental positive mental health perspective as the uniting philosophy for those involved in dealing with the psychological problems of looked after children. Argue that only a multi-disciplinary service combining the best of psychiatric, psychological, social work and childcare perspectives will be able to deal comprehensively with the needs and problems presented. See a service of this nature operating within Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services.

CRISIS? WHAT SERVICES?

G. Mahon

Mental Health Today, Feb. 2003, p. 14-15

Discusses progress in developing community-based crisis resolution services for people with mental health problems, which offer an alternative to hospital admission.

FOLLOW MY LEADER

M. Henwood

Community Care, Jan. 30th-Feb. 3rd 2003, p. 38

Wales is proposing the development of a strategy for services to people with autism spectrum disorders based on person-centred planning and multi-agency working.

GAP YEARS

L. Ward and others

Community Care, Feb. 20th-26th 2003, p. 34-35

Discusses how young people with learning difficulties and their families experience the transition from child to adult services. Research found that in many cases transition planning was poor or non-existent in spite of legislation and guidance aimed at helping implement it.

MAKING THINGS HAPPEN: FIRST REPORT OF THE LEARNING DISABILITIES TASK FORCE

Department of Health

London: 2003

Comments on delays in closing long-stay hospitals for people with learning difficulties, and resettling them in the community. Goes on to express concerns on a range of other issues, including:

  • the independence, decision-making and rights of people with learning disabilities, which are currently being considered by the Lord Chancellor's Department;
  • the inclusion of learning difficulties in the list of disorders covered by the Mental Health Bill, with implications for enforced treatment;
  • state funding levels of social and health services;
  • services for people with learning disabilities from minority ethnic communities;
  • use of advocacy funds by local authorities.

PERSONALITY DISORDER: NO LONGER A DIAGNOSIS OF EXCLUSION: POLICY IMPLEMENTATION GUIDANCE FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF SERVICES FOR PEOPLE WITH PERSONALITY DISORDER

National Institute for Mental Health in England

Leeds: 2003

Provides information for NHS Trusts about the government's intentions for delivery of personality disorder services within general mental health and forensic settings. Proposes the development of specialist multi-disciplinary personality disorder teams and day patient services within general mental health services.

THE STRUGGLE FOR UNDERSTANDING

National Autistic Society

Professional Social Work, Feb. 2003, p.16-17

Many people with autistic spectrum disorders and their families have difficulty accessing services because the condition does not fit into the categories of service offered by health and social care. It is neither a learning disability nor a mental health problem.

SUPPING WITH THE DEVIL

C. Jackson

Mental Health Today, Feb. 2003, p. 8-9

Discusses the experience of mental health service users who have volunteered to join NHS advisory groups, only to find that their contributions were derided or ignored.

SUPPORT, TIME AND RECOVERY (STR) WORKERS

Department of Health

London: 2003 (Mental Health Policy Implementation Guide)

Guidance is to provide a framework for local health and social care services to introduce Support, Time and Recovery workers into the mental health workforce.

SUSPICIOUS MINDS

M. Gould

Health Service Journal, vol. 113, Feb. 6th 2003, p. 14-15

The NHS is on track to meet the government's target of establishing 220 assertive outreach teams for people with mental health problems. However there are concerns that some of these may be existing community mental health terms renamed!

VULNERABLE TO CUTS

N. Goldie

Community Care, Feb. 13th-19th 2003, p. 36-37

Mental health services budgets are under pressure and they remain dislocated in many areas despite the aspirations set out in the National Service Framework.

WOMEN'S MENTAL HEALTH

A. Gulland

Health Which? Feb. 2003 p. 18-19

Mental health problems are more prevalent among women, but services are not designed to meet their needs. There is particular concern about lack of single sex wards and lack of effective user consultation.

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