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Welfare Reform on the Web (May 2003): Education - UK - Higher

CALL FOR 'LEARNING LICENCE' TO REPLACE A-LEVELS

J. Kelly

Financial Times, March 7th 2003, p.4

A-levels should be replaced by a 'Learning Licence' that would qualify students to move forward in the education system, according to research from Demos, one of Labour's favourite think tanks.

CLARKE ATTACKS SCHOOLS' UNWISE BOYCOTT OF BRISTOL

T. Halpin

The Times, March 6th 2003, p. 6

The Education Secretary told independent schools yesterday that they were wrong to boycott Bristol University for allegedly discriminating against their students. Bristol has said it will make lower offers to applicants from comprehensives with little history of applying to university.

CLARKE ATTACKS 'SOCIAL' TARGETS'

R. Smithers

The Guardian, March 14th 2003, p. 9

The government's higher education policy was plunged into confusion yesterday after Charles Clarke, the Education Secretary, ordered the higher education funding body to rethink its plan to introduce targets for the reduction of the social class gap in admissions to university.

(See also The Times, March 14th 2003, p.2)

CLARKE PLEDGE ON TWO-YEAR DEGREES

J. Kelly

Financial Times, March 5th 2003, p. 5

Charles Clarke, Education Secretary, will today pledge that two year, employer - led degrees are to be the "major vehicle" for expanding university education to include half the population by 2010.

INVEST IN CHANGE: SPEND MORE WISELY, TAX MORE FAIRLY

Liberal Democrats

[London]: 2003

Proposes abolishing student top-up and tuition's fees based on a 50% rate of income tax for those earning more than £100,000 a year. Would increase the basic state pension and scrap the pensioner tax credit, as well as introducing free care for the elderly. Finally suggests turning National Insurance into a permanent NHS Contribution.

MAPPING THE FUTURE

D. MacLeod

Guardian Education, March 18th 2003, p. 9

The author considers how funding changes will transform the map of higher education in England after the Higher Education Funding Council promised that by 2008 institutions would be "both more diverse and increasingly interconnected".

POOREST STUDENTS MAY ESCAPE FEE HIKE

R. Smithers

The Guardian, March 20th 2003, p. 14

The Education Secretary, Charles Clarke, said yesterday that students from working-class backgrounds are likely to be exempt from the proposed increased university tuition fees, raising the prospect that eventually only those from the middle and upper classes will pay for their courses.

(See also The Times, March 20th 2003, p.13)

PRIVATE SCHOOLS CALL FOR BOYCOTT OF UNIVERSITY

J. Kelly

Financial Times, March 5th 2003, p. 4

The country's top private schools yesterday called for a boycott of Bristol University, one of the country's best universities, claiming its drive to widen access to the poor was resulting in unfair discrimination against non-state school candidates.

RICH TO GET HIGHER

D. MacLeod

Guardian Education, March 25th 2003, p. 9

According to a report published by Standard and Poors one spin-off effect of top-up fees will be UK universities borrowing more to finance student accommodation and teaching facilities. But the report predicts mixed fortunes for different universities and an increase in mergers and closer collaborations as institutions scramble to improve their research ratings, attractiveness to students and financial stability. The report ranks five English universities by credit rating.

ROW OVER STUDENT CLASS GAP

W. Woodward

The Guardian, March 4th 2003, p. 1

After announcing plans to set a target to increase the proportion of working class students going to university, Magaret Hodge, the Higher Education Minister, was forced into a retraction by her boss, Charles Clarke. He said it was more important to improve the mix of students than reach existing targets.

A TALE OF TWO CITIES

R. Smithers

Guardian Education, March 18th 2003, p. 2-3

Nottingham is home to two excellent universities, so why are pupils in some parts of the city alienated from higher education?

THIRD OF ACADEMICS WANT TO QUIT

R. Smithers

The Guardian, March 10th 2003, p. 2

Nearly one in three of Britain's university academic and teaching staff is considering quitting because of a growing workload and poor pay, according to a survey by the Association of University Teachers.

UNIVERSITIES FACE FUNDING CUTS UNLESS THEY ATTRACT PRIVATE SPONSORSHIP

A. Grice

The Independent, March 3rd 2003, p. 1

Gordon Brown is threatening to cut universities funding unless they agree to management reforms, and attract more sponsorship from industry.

UNIVERSITY FUNDING SWITCH 'THREATENS THOUSANDS OF JOBS'

S. Cassidy

The Independent, March 7th 2003, p. 6

Lecturers' unions insist that hundreds of departments will put at risk because of the government's drive to switch research funding away from less prestigious institutions towards a few elite universities.

VICE-CHANCELLORS UNITE IN CALLING FOR £3,000 CAP ON TOP-UP FEES TO BE RAISED

R. Garner

The Independent, March 19th 2003, p. 13

Universities are urging the Government to lift its proposed £3,000-a-year cap on top-up fees. Sir Richard Sykes, Vice Chancellor of Imperial College London, told MPs the upper limit should be £5,000.

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