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Welfare Reform on the Web (May 2003): Education - UK - Training

CREATING A "MODERN APPRENTICESHP" A CRITIQUE OF THE UK'S MULTI-SECTOR, SOCIAL INCLUSION APPROACH

A. Fuller and L. Unwin

Journal of Education and Work, vol. 16, 2003, p. 5-25

Article begins by describing the origins and development of the UK's government-supported Modern Apprenticeship programme. Goes on to look at the generally passive role played by employers in the management of the scheme, at the characteristics of the apprentices, and at issues arising when apprenticeship is introduced into a non-traditional sector. Argues that the government is seeking to use the scheme to promote social inclusion for low academic achievers rather than to develop high quality technical skills. There are also indications that the scheme is being used to subsidise work related training for existing employees rather than new entrants.

DISAFFECTED YOUNG PEOPLE AND THE WORK RELATED CURRICULUM AT KEY STAGE 4: ISSUES OF SOCIAL CAPITAL DEVELOPMENT AND LEARNING AS A FORM OF CULTURAL PRACTICE

C. Raffo

Journal of Education and Work, vol. 16, 2003, p. 69-86

Article focuses on MPower, a scheme used in Manchester to try to re-engage and remotivate disaffected young people through provision of a work-related curriculum at key stage 4. Examines the socio-cultural factors that determine how young people understand and interact with work-related programmes.

ENTRY TO EMPLOYMENT

J. Holyfield

Working Brief, no. 142, 2003, p. 10-12

Entry to Employment (E2E) is a new programme to help hard to reach young people to learn. It can be delivered by a variety of learning providers including further education colleges, but requires organisations to work together to support learners. The programme is not expected to last more than 12 months and will provide each learner with their own individualised package.

A FORCE FOR GOOD

C. Mullen

Health Service Journal, vol. 113, Mar. 6th 2003, p. 34-35.

Greater Manchester Workforce Development Confederation, faced with a shortage of 2,000 clinical staff by 2004, initiated a programme to train assistant practitioners. The programme is aimed at attracting workers who have some care experience but lack the educational qualifications for traditional professional courses. The project has so far attracted 216 entrants.

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