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Welfare Reform on the Web (May 2003): Social Care - UK

COMMUNITY CARE (DELAYED DISCHARGES) BILL

Anon

Social Care Law Today, no. 9. 2003, p. 6-7

Analyses the key amendments made to the Bill by the House of Commons. The Bill now provides for assessment of carers' needs before patients are discharged into the community. Disputes between local authorities and NHS bodies will be resolved by strategic health authorities. Finally, the Bill now restricts the range of community care services that regulations may require to be provided free of charge.

DO YOU SPEAK MY LANGUAGE?

J. Snell

Community Care, Feb. 27th - Mar. 5th 2003, p.28 - 30

Progress has been made in breaking down professional barriers between nurses and social workers, especially in mental health. However, concerns remain over differences in working cultures.

INSIDE PANDORA'S BOX

M. Wigg

Caring Times, Mar. 2003, p. 8-9

Discusses the implications of the National Minimum Standards for the training of the residential care sector work force.

NEW INDEPENDENT SECTOR EMPLOYEES SET TO GAIN FROM CHANGES TO CONTRACT

D. Hayes

Community Care, Feb. 27th - Mar. 5th 2003, p.18-19

Private providers delivering public services will have to offer new recruits fair and reasonable terms and conditions, which are overall, "no less favourable" than those of employees transferred from the public sector. The main impact of the change for social services will be on intermediate care, residential homes and domiciliary care.

NEW LABOUR AND THE REGULATORY REFORM OF SOCIAL CARE

J. C. Humphrey

Critical Social Policy, issue 74, p. 5-24

The New Labour government has massively expanded regulatory bodies monitoring local authority performance. Article draws on a theoretical analysis of New Labour and Audit Commission texts and an empirical study of the regulatory reform of social care. It begins by exploring the New Labour policy of modernising social care and explains how this is being interpreted by reviewers and social services staff on the ground. Goes on to show how central regulatory authorities form a buffer zone between central and local government. Finally discusses the value conflicts that underpin the regulatory regime as local authorities and their regulators undertake the impossible task of reconciling economic, political, scientific and social values.

PROPOSED AMENDED ENVIRONMENTAL STANDARDS [FOR] CARE HOMES FOR OLDER PEOPLE AND YOUNGER ADULTS: ANALYSIS OF RESPONSES TO THE CONSULTATION

Department of Health

2003

In August 2002 the Department of Health issued a consultation document proposing that certain environmental standards should no longer be applied to existing care homes. This report presents key findings from the consultation. Of 243 respondents, 118 (the majority of which were care homes) welcomed the proposed relaxation of the rules. On the other hand, 65, including nearly all the national "umbrella" organisations, opposed changing the environmental standards.

SOCIAL CARE ACCESS TO AND USE OF THE NHS NUMBER

Department of Health

2003

As well as setting out the current position with regard to use of the NHS number by Social Services, guidance outlines work under way to address data protection issues, NHS net connection and access to the National Strategic Tracking Service.

SOCIAL SERVICES: GENERAL

Anon

Social Care Law Today, issue 9, 2003, p.10-11

Analyses two aspects of the current Local Government Bill that will have an impact of social services:

  • relaxation of local authority borrowing rules;
  • statutory performance categories for local authorities in England.
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