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Welfare Reform on the Web (June 2003): Child Welfare - UK

THE ADOPTION AND CHILDREN ACT 2002

D. Cullen

Family Law, vol. 33, 2003, p.235-239

Reviews the Adoption and Children Act 2002. The Act is similar to the draft Adoption Bill published for consultation in 1996. It updates the law, aims to increase adoption and improve the adoption service. Highlights the main changes in adoption law and some of the changes to the Children Act 1989. Gives the implementation and consultation schedules on draft regulations and guidance.

ADOPTION OPTIONS

R. Foggitt

Community Care, 17-23 April 2003, p. 34

Presents concurrent planning where children are placed with foster carers until they either return to their birth parents or are adopted by the foster carers. Looks at the experiences of three concurrency teams in the UK. Finds that despite some criticisms it works well for the children involved.

CHILD PROTECTION: LESSONS FROM THE RECENT PAST

D. Kinnair

Community Practitioner, vol. 76, 2003, p. 121-122

Summarises the recommendations of the Laming Inquiry into the death of Victoria Climbié for improving the child protection system and the government's response.

CHILD WELFARE: HISTORICAL DIMENSIONS, CONTEMPORARY DEBATE

H. Hendrick

Bristol: The Policy Press, 2003

Children and child welfare sit at the heart of New Labour's plans for social inclusion, but:

  • how does the government view 'children'?
  • is it reflecting public opinion or leading it?
  • how does New Labour perceive 'child welfare'?
  • what are the motivations behind, and objectives of, current social policy for children?

This book examines contemporary policies within a historical context, uses the concept of 'ageism' as an explanatory device and relates concepts of childhood to policy formation and implementation.

DEVELOPING A MULTI-AGENCY TEENAGE PREGNANCY STRATEGY

L. Watson

Community Practitioner, vol. 76, 2003, p.133-137

Discusses the process of developing a strategy for tackling teenage pregnancy in Swindon through the work of a multi-agency taskforce. A reflective practice model is used to derive the principles of change management and development of effective groups underlying the process of developing a multi-agency strategy. Consideration is given to how these principles can be used by practitioners to tackle health inequalities.

FAMILY SUPPORT : THE ROLES OF EARLY YEARS CENTRES

R. H. Kirk

Children and Society, vol. 17, 2003, p.85-99

Describes a longitudinal study which explored the links between different models of early years centres and the expansion of parent support networks. Focused on a group of parents living in a deprived urban community in Scotland who used either a nursery school, a day nursery or a family centre. Argues that all types of centres need to develop a comprehensive approach in which child development through care and education as well as family support are explicit functions.

FAST TRACK TO PLACEMENTS

E. Monck

Community Care, 17-23 April 2003, p. 36-37

Examines concurrent planning where children are placed with foster carers until they either return to their birth parents or are adopted by the foster carers. Compares concurrent planning with tradition methods of placement. Finds concurrent planning has advantages.

FREE THE SPIRIT

D. Callaghan

Community Care, 24-30 April 2003, p. 28-29

Argues that professionals working with children should aid the development of a child's spirituality. Investigates whether various agencies are helping children with this development.

INTEGRATED STRATEGY FOR EARLY YEARS

Children and Young Peoples Group, Scottish Executive

Edinburgh: 2003

Consultation paper sets out a framework for the effective provision of universal and targeted services for children and their families from pre-birth to age 5. The proposed strategy draws together existing policies for health, education and social care which are directed at the early years of a child's life.

NEW KID ON THE BLOCK

B. Hudson

Health Service Journal, vol. 113, Apr. 17th 2003, p. 24-25

The proposed new integrated children's trusts will combine some of the services offered by education authorities, social services and the NHS. The establishment of these trusts will require structural integration with local authority services which may not appeal to all in the NHS. The government seems prepared to consider almost any form for these trusts. Partnership, not restructuring, would seem the best way forward.

PRIVATE FOSTERING: OLD PROBLEMS, NEW URGENCY

B. Holman

Adoption and Fostering, vol. 27, 2003, p.8-18

Examines private fostering and its history. Investigates the scale of private fostering and the groups of children involved. Covers the children's vulnerability to abuse and their cultural, racial and social needs. Proposes improvements and safeguards to private fostering.

RICH AND POOR

P. J. White

Young People Now, no. 177, 2003, p.15-17

The Department for Education and Skills assumes a baseline spend in each local authority of £75.96 per year for each 13 to 19-year-old. It adds to this a top-up based on deprivation and an area cost. The result is a total allocation per young person ranging from £79.00 to £348.00. Latest National Youth Agency audit figures for 2000/01 show local authority spending ranging from £28.00 to £227.00 per young person. Article discusses reasons for the disparities.

RISK AND RESILIENCE IN THE LIFE COURSE: IMPLICATIONS FOR INTERVENTIONS AND SOCIAL POLICIES

I. Schoon and J. Bynner

Journal of Youth Studies, vol. 6, 2003, p.21-31

Paper reviews recent research on resilience, a construct describing positive adaptation in the face of adversity. Findings indicate that particular personal attributes can serve as protective factors, but are themselves shaped by life circumstances. Resilience is produced through interactions between the young person and aspects of the environment they experience. paper goes on to explore the possible application of these findings to the development of interventions and social policies aimed at promoting the well being of disadvantaged young people in the UK.

THE TRAINING NOW ARRIVING...

G. Hopkins

Community Care, Apr. 3rd - 9th 2003, p.34-35

Historically, attempts to establish a separate qualification for residential child care work alongside that for social work have been shortlived in the UK. Author attributes this neglect to the low status of residential care work. Notes that the pattern is being broken in Scotland with the launch of two full time residential child care courses at the University of Strathclyde, Glasgow and the Robert Gordon University, Aberdeen.

WILTSHIRE'S PATHWAYS: ENGAGING STAKEHOLDERS IN PLANNING JOINED-UP CHILDREN'S SERVICES

P. Fanshawe

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 11, 2003, p. 31-35

Presents a study of the Wiltshire Children's Services Pathways Project. The project was a multi-agency process aiming to identify the needs of children and young people and help them obtain relevant services. The project resulted in the Wiltshire Children and Young People's Services Plan.

WINNING AGAINST THE ODDS

A. Mainey

Community Care, Apr. 3rd - 9th 2003, p. 36-37

Reports results of a survey aimed at determining levels of staff morale in residential children's homes. Three-quarters of respondents said they were satisfied or very satisfied with their jobs, and nearly as many said morale was okay or high in their homes. Findings emphasized the importance of good teamwork in maintaining morale. Staff were also frustrated by lack of co-operation from social services and education in supporting young people.

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