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Welfare Reform on the Web (June 2003): Mental Health Services - UK

THE ACUTE INPATIENT PRACTICE DEVELOPMENT NETWORK: A CHANGE MANAGEMENT INITIATIVE

B. Delord

Mental Health Review, vol. 8, Mar. 2003, p. 22-26

The Acute Inpatient Practice Development Network is a two-year process for change for developing practical, evidence-based staff skills with a stronger user focus and for supporting organisation to enable change. It aims to support trusts in improving inpatient care for mental health service users.

ADULTS WITH INCAPACITY (SCOTLAND) ACT 2000: REVIEW OF THE CODE OF PRACTICE FOR PART 5, MEDICAL TREATMENT AND RESEARCH

Scottish Executive Health Department

Edinburgh: 2003

Part 5 of the Act confers a general authority on doctors to carry out procedures which are reasonable under the circumstances in order to safeguard the health of a patient who is incapable of consenting. Consultation document addresses workload and operational concerns about the processes involved in the assessment and certification procedures set out in the Code of Practice.

CONSULTATION PAPER ON THE MENTAL HEALTH LAW RESEARCH PROGRAMME

Scottish Executive Social Research

Edinburgh: TSO, 2003

Presents proposals to monitor the effectiveness of the new mental health laws in Scotland. Outlines four broad areas where research will concentrate under the new Act:

  • use and outcomes of compulsory measures;
  • the decision making process leading to compulsory treatment;
  • people with mental disorder within the criminal justice system;
  • Mental Health law: rights, duties and powers.

CONTESTING PSYCHOSIS

A. Cooke

Mental Health Today, Apr. 2003, p.28-29

Describes the development of a training pack which challenges the medical model of psychosis as being caused by a chemical imbalance in the brain.

DAY SERVICES MODERNISATION TOOLKIT

B. Love, P. Bates and S. Whitehead

Bristol: Valuing People Support Team, 2003

Summarises what is known about best practice for modernising day care services for people with learning difficulties in order to help local Partnership Boards develop their plans. Second part provides practical advice on managing day service change.

DEVELOPING INPATIENT SERVICES FOR WOMEN: CHALLENGES AND IMPLICATIONS

K. Vardi

Mental Health Review, vol. 8, Mar. 2003, p. 32-35

Article comments on the Department of Health's strategy for the development of mental health services for women. Looks at the current context of acute inpatient services for people with mental illness and how this interacts with attempts to provide appropriate services for women. It explores why the development of services for women has been a low priority and considers the implications of the new strategy for organisations and staff.

IMPLEMENTING THE ACUTE INPATIENT STRATEGY

M. Rae, P. Rooney with R. Butterworth

Mental Health Review, vol. 8, Mar. 2003, p.17-21

The drive to develop community services has led to little attention being paid to hospital care for mental health service users. Authors comments on new guidance from the Department of Health aimed at improving acute mental health inpatient care.

IMPROVING MENTAL HEALTH INPATIENT CARE

P. West

Mental Health Review, vol. 8, Mar. 2003, p. 9-16

Paper explores current challenges facing mental health inpatient care, and outlines new developments in the field. It looks at the historical context and the emergence of staff and user dissatisfaction, and outlines new initiatives that are having an impact at ward level.

MAKING CHANGE HAPPEN: THE GOVERNMENT'S ANNUAL REPORT ON LEARNING DISABILITY 2003

Department of Health

London: TSO, 2003 (House of Commons papers, session 2002/03; HC 514)

Reports on progress in modernising services for people with learning difficulties in the wake of the Valuing People white paper. Covers services for children and young people, support for parents and carers, access to employment, provision of a range of housing options offering real choice, access to healthcare, and offering service users greater control of their own lives.

MINDING THE GAP

P. Hislop and K. Mullett

Community Living, vol. 16, no. 3, 2003, p.17-20

Study sought to establish whether legislation and guidance were being followed for young people with learning difficulties and their families at transition to adulthood. Survey results showed that a fifth of youngsters had left school without a transition plan. Almost half the young people had little or no involvement in planning for their future. The quality of transition planning varied widely; in some cases it was ad hoc, confused and uncoordinated. For many young people, key issues such as transfer to adult health or social services, had still not been addressed by the time they left school. However, whether or not they had received transition planning made little difference to what happened in practice when they left school. There were few post-school options available to young people, particularly in relation to housing and employment. There was also a lack of information about future possibilities.

MOVING FROM LONG-STAY HOSPITALS: THE VIEWS OF NORTHERN IRISH PATIENTS AND RELATIONS

R. McConhey and others

Journal of Learning Disabilities, vol. 7, 2003, p. 78-93

Data were gathered on a cohort of 68 people with learning difficulties who had been resettled from a long-stay hospital over a five year period. Interviews were conducted with 39 residents and 34 relatives. A total of 90% had moved a residential or nursing homes. Nearly all were happy to have moved. After the move, all families felt the new accommodation was at least as good as the hospital, with most rating it much better. On the basis of the findings, authors recommend informing families about alternatives to residential care such as supported housing, regular reviews of clients' needs, and access to independent advocacy.

NATIONAL AUTISM PLAN FOR CHILDREN

National Initiative for Autism Screening and Assessment

London: National Autistic Society, 2003

Provides guidelines on the identification, assessment, diagnosis of and access to early interventions for pre-school and primary school-aged children with autistic spectrum disorders (ASDs)

NEEDS ASSESSMENT REPORT ON CHILD AND ADOLESCENT MENTAL HEALTH: FINAL REPORT

Public Health Institute for Scotland, 2003

Report recommends that service provision for young people should be improved through a focus on their rights, and a concentration on mental health promotion, early detection of problems and prevention of mental ill health.

ONWARDS AND UPWARDS

Anon

Mental Health Today, Apr. 2003, p. 31-33

Middlesex University is pioneering the first UK degree course in generic mental health work.

PICK AND CHOOSE

A. Last

Health Service Journal, vol 113, Apr. 23rd 2003, p. 28-29

Describes how Birmingham Primary Care Trust and Social Services involved uses and their carers in the selection of a new learning disabilities services manager. The users were involved in drawing up five questions for each candidate. On the basis of their answers, each candidate was scored by the service users. It was agreed that no-one would be appointed if the user and carer panel considered them unsuitable. The users, carers and managers were unanimous in their choice of candidate.

THE REFOCUSING MODEL: A MEANS OF REALISING THE NATIONAL ACUTE INPATIENT STRATEGY

N. Bowles and R. Howard

Mental Health Review, vol. 8, Mar. 2003, p. 27-31

Authors describe the "refocusing" model of change to acute mental health inpatient care. This has impacted positively on inpatients and staff with reductions in both financial costs and clinical risk. "Refocusing" is based on Karasek's job strain model and aims to increase job control and decision latitude, reduce demands and increase social support.

SAVING LIVES

S. Armson

Mental Health Today, Apr. 2003, p. 14-15

Discusses progress in implementing the national suicide prevention strategy and reducing suicide rates in England and Wales.

SCOTTISH SHAKE-UP BIDS TO BALANCE INTERESTS OF THE PUBLIC AND CLIENTS

C. Kenny

Community Care, Apr. 3rd - 9th 2003, p. 16-17

Outlines provisions of the new Mental Health (Care and Treatment) (Scotland) Act 2003. These include:

  • a right to independent advocacy;
  • introduction of compulsory treatment orders;
  • a duty to provide "age appropriate" settings for inpatients under 18;
  • a new right of appeal against excessive security;
  • a new mechanism for nominating a "named person" who can give consent to compulsory treatment;
  • introduction of tribunals to decide on compulsory treatment in place of the Sheriff Court.

SOCIAL WORK AND CHILD AND ADOLESCENT MENTAL HEALTH

S. Walker

Lyme Regis: Russell House Publishing, 2003.

This book identifies the policy and legislative context of social work in the field of child and adolescent mental health. It examines definitions and prevalence; assessment and understanding; culturally competent practice; social work interventions; inter-professional and multi-disciplinary care; society inclusive practice; effectiveness and evaluation.

THREE PATHS, ONE DESTINATION

A. Thompson

Community Care, Apr. 10th-16th 2003, p. 40-41

Compares the three routes currently used by practitioners to compulsorily treat children with severe mental illness. They can use the Mental Health Act 1983, the Children Act 1989 or the powers of parental consent.

AN UNSCIENTIFIC SUCCESS

S. Gillard

Community Care, Mar. 27th - 2nd Apr. 2003, p. 44-45

Describes a consultation exercise with mental health service users in Slough which led to real changes in services. Data were gathered through interviews with 50 service users.

VALUING ASSESSMENTS AND REPORTS? THE IMPACT OF 'VALUING PEOPLE' ON PEOPLE WITH A LEARNING DISABILITY

S. Cumella

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 11, 2003, p. 3-8

Examines the proposals of the 'Valuing People' White Paper. Questions the value of unenforceable multiple assessments. Concludes the assessments will divert resources away from responding directly to need.

WOMEN ONLY

S. Wellard

Community Care, Apr. 10th-16th 2003, p. 34-35

Discusses special needs of women with mental health problems, for which there is currently little provision. Mentally distressed women need to be treated on single sex hospital wards. There is also a need for more family focused services to support mothers, and for routine screening for post-natal depression.

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