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Welfare Reform on the Web (June 2003): Social Care - Overseas

SOCIAL WORK EDUCATION: AGENCIES AND ACADEMIC DISCIPLINES

M. Nash

International Social Work, vol. 46, 2003, p.23-35

Looks at social work education with particular reference to New Zealand. Examines whether social work should be taught at university and whether social work is an academic discipline it its own right. Concludes that it is an applied discipline. Increasingly industry negotiates with the providers of education to determine the education programme offered. Social work academics in New Zealand are concerned in case minimal competency levels are accepted.

SOCIAL WORK STUDENTS AND SOCIAL CHANGE: ON THE LINK BETWEEN VIEWS ON POVERTY, SOCIAL WORK GOALS AND POLICY PRACTICE

I. Weiss

International Journal of Social Welfare, vol. 12, 2003, p. 132-141

Investigates social work students' willingness to participate in policy formulation and development. Looks at this willingness in relation to the students' views on poverty and on the goals of social work. Analyses the views of social work students at an Israeli University and discusses their implications.

WELFARE, SOCIAL EXCLUSION AND REFLEXIVITY: THE CASE OF CHILD AND WOMAN PROTECTION

H. Ferguson

Journal of Social Policy, vol. 32, April 2003, p.199-216

Looks at reflexivity where those who receive welfare services reflect upon and shape their lives. From evidence of a study of woman and child protection argues that the socially excluded can use welfare services to engage in reflexivity and life planning. Finds that reflexivity requires a complex understanding of agency.

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