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Welfare Reform on the Web (June 2003): Social Security - Overseas

CAUGHT IN THE NET: THE IMPACT OF CHANGES TO CANADIAN EMPLOYMENT INSURANCE LEGISLATION ON PART-TIME WORKERS

N. Pupo and A. Duffy

Social Policy and Society, vol. 2, 2003, p. 1-11

Reviews the impact of unemployment insurance policies in Canada. Unemployment insurance policies cover fewer people as eligibility rules have been tightened. Finds changes have a particularly detrimental effect on part-time workers and women.

HELPING FAMILIES WORK WELL WITH WELFARE REFORM: FROM THEORY TO PRACTICE

S. Wycoff and S. Cameron

Family Journal, vol. 11, 2003, p.148-152

Authors offer practical suggestions for family doctors and social workers working with families leaving welfare for work in the US. Issues covered include:

  • housing assistance;
  • access to health care;
  • education and training;
  • access to child care.

INDIVIDUAL ACCOUNTS IN SOCIAL SECURITY: CAN THEY BE PROGRESSIVE?

M. Sherraden

International Journal of Social Welfare, vol. 12, 2003, p. 97-107

Notes the shift towards regressive asset based social welfare in the form of individual accounts. Presents instances where steps have been made towards the idea of a universal, progressive asset based social welfare policy. Discusses the idea and acknowledges the difficulties in trying to achieve such a model.

SOCIAL SECURITY PRIVATISATION: THE LESSONS FROM THE CHILEAN EXPERIENCE FOR OTHER LATIN AMERICAN COUNTRIES AND THE USA

S. Borzutzky

International Journal of Social Welfare, vol. 12, 2003, p. 86-96

Analyses the privatisation of social security in Chile since the 1980s. Examines its consequences and draws lessons from it. Discusses privatisation of social security in other Latin American countries and argues against the movement towards privatisation in the USA.

SOCIAL SECURITY REFORMS IN CHINA: ISSUES AND PROSPECTS

J. C. B. Leung

International Journal of Social Welfare, vol. 12, 2003, p. 73-85

Examines the social security reforms in China since the 1980s. Concentrates on pension reforms, programmes for the unemployed and the social assistance programme. Identifies shortcomings of the reforms.

WORKING BUT POOR: HOW ARE FAMILIES FARING?

M. K. Meyers and J. M Lee

Children and Youth Services Review, vol. 25, 2003, p. 177-201

Paper uses data from a sample of families with children in New York City to describe the characteristics and well-being of working poor families, and to compare their circumstances to both the non-poor and the non-working poor. Finds that while working poor families were doing somewhat better than non-working poor families, they continued to experience significant levels of material hardship. Working poor families were also much less likely than non-working poor families to receive food, housing or health insurance assistance from government. Calls for policies to raise the floor under earnings for working poor families and to increase the availability of other public assistance.

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