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Welfare Reform on the Web (July 2003): Education - UK - Higher

GOVERNMENT ADVISER CHARTS ESCAPE FROM GOLDEN TRIANGLE

R Blitz

Financial Times, May 6th 2003, p.6

According to government's Chief Scientific Adviser Sir David King, the way to get the best out of universities outside the London and Oxbridge elite group is to engage them in a "stick-and-carrot" process that recognises good behaviour.

LABOUR MAY SCRAP UPFRONT ANNUAL FEES

G Owen

The Times, May 19th 2003, p.7

Ministers are considering scrapping upfront fees for university students as part of a hasty rethink after a Tory pledge to abolish charges.

REGIONS STRUGGLE FOR A STAR ROLE IN RESEARCH

R Blitz

Financial Times, May 6th 2003, p.6

Author asks how do you encourage science competition and maintain international research, while at the same time solving your social and economic problems?

REVIEW SUGGESTS NEW GRANT SYSTEM FOR UNIVERSITIES

J Kelly

Financial Times, May 29th 2003, p.4

The £1bn-a year allocation of grants to universities under the Research Assessment Exercise should be replaced with a new "three-track" system to reduce manipulation by academics.

STUDENTS 'WORST IN LIVING MEMORY'

G Owen

The Times, May 23rd 2003, p.10

Falling academic standards have made the current crop of university students the worst in living memory, according to a survey of long-standing academics conducted by the paper.

TORIES TO SCRAP TUITION FEES

P Webster and G Owen

The Times, May 13th 2003, p.1

All students would be entitled to free university education under an attempt by the Conservatives to recapture the middle classes. Iain Duncan Smith also announced that the Tories will scrap the Government's target of getting half of all young people to university by the end of the decade.

(See also The Independent, May 13th 2003, p.8; The Guardian, May 13th 2003, p.12; The Daily Telegraph, May 13th 2003, p.1)

UNIVERSITIES FACE END OF 'ONE SIZE FITS ALL' FUNDING

R Blitz

Financial Times, May 6th 2003, p.6

The government's white paper on higher education funding has given shape to a trend that many had long suspected: science research investment is being steered predominantly to an elite built around the "golden triangle" of Oxford, Cambridge and London. Rather than all institutions competing for funding, the government wants less research-intensive ones to focus on how their work can be spun out into commercial ventures.

UNIVERSITIES' FLAWED COMPLAINTS SYSTEM COULD BE SCRAPPED

R Smithers

The Guardian, May 15th 2003, p.6

The end of the antiquated university "visitor" system for dealing with student grievances appears in sight after a land mark case, involving a former student's long running dispute, was referred to the Court of Appeal. For students at the old universities, the only appeal route is to the university visitor - in many cases the Queen, acting through the Privy Council or a bishop.

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