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Welfare Reform on the Web (July 2003): Social Care - Overseas

CO-FINANCING AS A MEANS TO IMPROVE COLLABORATION BETWEEN PRIMARY HEALTH CARE, SOCIAL INSURANCE AND SOCIAL SERVICE IN SWEDEN: QUALITATIVE STUDY OF COLLABORATION EXPERIENCES AMONG REHABILITATION PARTNERS

E. L. Hultberg, K. Lonnroth and P. Allebeck

Health Policy, vol 64, 2003, p.143-152

Investigates the collaboration between health services, social security and social services in Goteborg, Sweden under the DELTA project. Part of the DELTA project, which started in 1997, examined the extent of collaboration around patients with musculoskeletal diseases requiring rehabilitation. Investigates the effect of co-financing on interdisciplinary collaboration, procedures and staff goals.

AN EVALUATION OF THE NEW HOME-CARE NEEDS ASSESSMENT POLICY IN THE NETHERLANDS

M. Algera and others

Health and Social Care in the Community, vol. 11, 2003, p.232-241

Examines a new needs assessment process in the Netherlands which is regulated by the Needs Assessment Decree. Home-care needs are assessed independently of whether the care is available and integrated with other types of care. Investigates how assessment agencies' reports are viewed by assessment agencies, health insurers and home-care organisations. Assessment agencies are generally most positive about the new process, followed by health insurers, with the home-care organisations the least positive. Finds that the Dutch appear to have succeeded in providing an independent, integral and objective needs assessment process.

FROM BARRIERS TO SUCCESSFUL COLLABORATION: PUBLIC SCHOOLS AND CHILD WELFARE WORKING TOGETHER

S.J. Altshuler

Social Work, vol. 48, 2003, p.52-63

Few mechanisms exist to support collaboration between state schools and child welfare agencies in the USA. Study used focus groups made up of teachers, caseworkers and pupils to explore how the two systems could work together more collaboratively to support children in foster care. Found that sensitive understanding of the needs of these children was needed from teachers, together with trusting collaborative relationships between professionals.

INFORMAL CAREGIVERS' EXPERIENCES OF FORMAL SUPPORT IN A CHANGING CONTEXT

J. Wiles

Health and Social Care in the Community, vol. 11, 2003, p.189-207

Analyses the relationship between formal healthcare support services and informal caregivers and recipients of care in Ontario, Canada. Interviews were used to investigate caregivers' knowledge about, the experience of, using formal support services. A number of key themes were identified. There was a lack of awareness of support services, the services were inflexible, they were of a limited nature and the quality of the services provided was an issue. Identifies a number of ways informal caregivers could be helped, including public awareness campaigns, providing advocates to help caregivers negotiate the formal support system and increasing funding for formal community support services.

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