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Welfare Reform on the Web (Summer 2003): Care of the Elderly - UK

FORMAL AND INFORMAL CARE FOR PEOPLE WITH DEMENTIA: VARIATIONS IN COSTS OVER TIME

J. Schneider and others

Ageing and society, Vol. 23, 2003, p.303-326

Non-domestic care is commonly perceived as the more costly care option when only financial costs to the patient and family are taken into account. The study demonstrates that the costs of domestic care, including time and labour contributed by informal carers, are higher than the costs of non-domestic care. This holds true even when level of dementia is taken into account. There is also evidence of informal care being supplemented by formal services in the early stages of care, followed by substitution of formal for informal care as the person with dementia enters a residential home.

PROMOTING INDEPENDENCE: BUT PROMOTING WHAT AND HOW?

J. Secher and others

Ageing and society, Vol. 23, 2003, p.375-391

"Promoting independence" is a central theme of the UK government's modernisation agenda for health and social services. "Independence however is rarely defined. Based on a review of the literature on independence in older age, the paper examines the term and its meanings. For older people, independence not only means self-reliance but also self-esteem, self-determination, having a purpose in life and continuity of the self. The article presents a model which combines high levels of dependence on others for physical care with high levels of experienced or felt independence in the sense of people continuing to be offered choice and to have a useful social role.

SENIOR SERVICE

C. Lewis

Health Service Journal, Vol. 113, June 26th 2003, p.35

The article explores how services to older people are being improved through greater collaboration between health and social care and senior citizens themselves.

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