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Welfare Reform on the Web (Summer 2003): Education - UK - Higher

BLAIR FACES NEW REBELLION ON TOP-UP FEES

S. Hall

The Guardian, June 23rd 2003, p.1

Tony Blair will receive a warning shot from his own parliamentary backbenchers over the contentious issue of top-up fees today. A total of 173 Labour MPs have signed early day motions opposing the fees, which critics argue will create a "two-tier" university system.

CAMBRIDGE CHIEF CALLS FOR TUITION FEES TO RISE TO £6,000

J. Kelly

Financial Times, June 16th 2003, p.3

The £3,000 "cap" on student tuition fees should be raised to £6,000 according to Sir Alec Broers, the outgoing Voce-Chancellor of Cambridge University. The current cap is set to stay throughout the next parliament under a pledge given by the Education Secretary.

CAN'T PAY, WON'T PAY

N. Barr

The Guardian, June 12th 2003, p.21

The author considers how best to widen university access - by abolishing fees, as the Tories suggest, or by enhancing student loans, as the Government plans?

GRADUATES OPT FOR MORE STUDY RATHER THAN JOBS

J. Kelly

Financial Times, June 19th 2003, p.5

For the first time in a decade the number of students expecting to start a full time graduate job this summer is less than the number planning to continue in post-graduate courses. Worried about job prospects, thousands now plan to boost their marketability with extra qualifications, according to the annual UK Graduate Career Survey.

(See also The Independent, June 19th 2003, p.9)

HIGHER EDUCATION: MARKETING IN A QUASI-COMMERCIAL SERVICE INDUSTRY

M. Brookes

International Journal of Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Marketing, Vol. 8, 2003, p.134-142

Based on personal interviews and recent media releases, the article explores how recent higher education reforms in the UK will affect the marketing approaches of British universities as students become consumers and academics have to learn to become business like.

IMPROVING THE RETENTION OF STUDENTS FROM LOWER SOCIO-ECONOMIC GROUPS

M. Yorke and L. Thomas

Journal of Higher Education Policy and Management, Vol. 25, 2003, p.63-74

Success in higher education for students from lower socio-economic groups and from disadvantaged backgrounds is becoming an increasingly important policy goal in the UK. An analysis of HEFCE performance indicators identified six English universities performing above their benchmarks with regard to both widening participation and student retention and completion. The study used semi-structured interviews to investigate the secrets of their success.

INSTITUTE ENDORSES TOP-UP FEE REFORMS

W. Woodward

The Guardian, June 26th 2003, p.10

Lower income families in England would benefit more from the Government's proposals for top-up fees than they would from Conservative plans to scrap tuition charges, according to the Institute of Fiscal Studies.

(See also Financial Times, June 26th 2003, p.5)

QUALITY AND POWER IN HIGHER EDUCATION

L. Morley

Maidenhead: SRHE and Open University Press, 2003

The book examines the power relationships that organize and facilitate quality assurance in higher education. It poses the questions:

  • what signs of quality in higher education are being performed and valued?
  • what losses, gains, fears and anxieties are activated by the procedures?
  • is the culture of excellence resulting in mediocrity?

A wide range of issues are covered including: new manageralism, the cost of quality assurance, peer review, gender and equality implications, stress performance, league tables, increasing workloads, and the long-term effects on the academy.

RESEARCH FUND PLANS "THREATEN 8,000 JOBS"

W. Woodward

The Guardian, June 19th 2003, p.5

University lecturers and learned societies have attacked the Government's plan to concentrate research funding on elite institutions. The Association of University Teachers says there is a threat to the long term future of 8,000 staff in 500 grade 4 departments.

SORTING SWANS FROM DUCKLINGS

D. Macleod

Guardian Education, June 3rd 2003, p.10-11

The new rules for research assessment exercise will result in fewer players - a fact which has not gone down well with many universities. The article examines the new proposals for university research assessment.

UNIVERSITIES RISK CLOSURE AS FUN DING PROBLEMS WORSEN

G. Owen

The Times, June 23rd 2003, p.6

More than one in five British universities is in financial trouble and risks being closed or taken over, an audit by HSBC bank has concluded. Out of nearly 100 universities in Britain, HSBC says that 11 appear to be in a particularly weak position, with debts running at twice the level of total general funds.

UNIVERSITY PLAN SPARKS ANGER

W. Woodward

The Guardian, June 4th 2003, p.5

Government plans to allow higher education institutions which teach only one subject and carry out no research to be called universities have been condemned by vice chancellors and lecturers. The new system, expected to be in place by autumn 2004, will open the way for expansion and liberalisation of the student market.

(See also the Times, June 4th 2003, p.1 and the Daily Telegraph, June 4th 2003, p.1)

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