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Welfare Reform on the Web (Summer 2003): Education - Overseas

ANOTHER COUNTRY

H. Pidd

Guardian Education, June 17th 2003, p.14-15

As Berlin's universities reach crisis point, the author describes her German education experience where some £143m of educational budget cuts are scheduled to be phased in over the next four years.

BOYS, SCHOOLING AND MASCULINITIES: INTERROGATING THE "RIGHT" WAS TO EDUCATE BOYS

W. Martino and D. Berill

Educational Review, Vol. 55, 2003, p.99-117

The paper addresses issues relating to boy's education in the context of a backlash against feminism. It draws on relevant literature form Australia, the UK and North America to show how a resurgence of the Right has colonised the pedagogical space in relation to setting the boys' educational agenda.

BUREAUCRATIC CONTROL OR PROFESSIONAL AUTONOMY? PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT IN NEW ZEALAND SCHOOLS

T. Fitzgerald, H. Youngs and P. Grootenboer

School leadership and management, Vol. 23, 2003, p.91-105

Since 1997 appraisal has been a mandated requirement of New Zealand schools. The article details recent research conducted to ascertain teacher perceptions of appraisal in new Zealand schools. Results point to a heightened professional response to appraisal if teachers are systematically and collegially involved in the development and implementation of appraisal policies and processes.

GLOBALISATION AND HIGHER EDUCATION RESTRUCTURING IN HONG KONG, TAIWAN AND MAINLAND CHINA

K.-H. Mok

Higher Education Research and Development, Vol. 22, 2003, p.117-129

The article reviews the most recent higher education reforms in Hong Kong, Taiwan and China with particular reference to issues of decentralisation and marketisation.

GOING GLOBAL: THE IMPLICATIONS FOR STUDENTS WITH A DISABILITY

P. McLean, M. Heagney and K. Gardner

Higher Education Research and Development, Vol. 22, 2003, p.217-228

The paper considers the implications of internationalism for disabled students, focusing on study abroad, exchange and international students travelling to Australia, and Australian students going abroad. It considers the curriculum implications of the internationalism of education for students with a disability and explores the ways in which cultural factors affect opportunities for inclusion of disabled students in the higher education sector. It also examines the effect of the advance in information technology, the implications for inclusive curriculum and the complexities inherent in cross-cultural expectations on students with a disability.

HIGHER EDUCATION, COMMERCIAL CRITERIA AND ECONOMIC INCENTIVES

F. Stilwell

Journal of Higher Education, Policy and Management, Vol. 25, 2003, p.51-61

Commercial criteria are increasing being used to restructure higher education. They influence both broad institutional policies and governance, and the incentives offered to academics. These changes reflect the influence of an "economic rationalist" perspective, and can have perverse consequences.

THE IMPACT OF GLOBALISATION ON HIGHER EDUCATION GOVERNANCE IN JAPAN

A. Yonezawa

Higher Education Research and Development, Vol. 22, 2003, p.145-154

Education reform in Japan is now regarded as a means of revitalising a society facing an identity crisis under the pressure of globalisation. The current approach to higher education reform can be characterised as "layman-controlled", with the media, the parliament and the government being involved. There is at the same time pressure on young Japanese to study hard to help Japan survive in the global marketplace, and conflicting demands to have a more humane education atmosphere. There is also the need to improve the recognition of the value of a university degree amongst Japanese industrialists.

INTERNATIONALISATION OF BUSINESS EDUCATION: MEANING AND IMPLEMENTATION

R. Edwards and others

Higher Education Research and Development, Vol. 22, 2003, p.183-192

The paper presents a framework of typology to assist curriculum designers as they address the issue of internationalisation. It proposes that curriculum internationalisation might be interpreted as a staged process, with each stage having defined aims, teaching strategies, teaching methods and educational outcomes. Three levels are involved in the typology: international awareness, international competence and international expertise. The typology is intended to act as a guide to curriculum designers so that a deep-seated change in the knowledge, attitudes and capacities of students will be achieved.

THE PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SCHOOL PARTNERSHIP

P. Frumpton, V.L. Vaughn and M.J. Didelot

Journal of Educational Administration, Vol. 41, 2003, p.292-309

Professional development schools (PDS) rose in the USA during the second wave of school reforms in the 1980s. They were designed to improve teacher-training and to contribute to the continuing professional development of existing teachers through partnerships between the schools and university faculty. The study examined the effectiveness of PDS as perceived by a purposeful sample of Midwest teachers and heads. Results showed that in general teachers had found PDS more effective in improving practice than school heads.

REFORMING UNIVERSITY EDUCATION IN HONG KONG AND SINGAPORE

M.H. Lee and S. Gopinathan

Higher Education Research and Development, Vol. 22, 2003, p.167-182

The article reviews and compares some recent developments in university reform in both city states. It argues that universities are subject to the same drives towards accountability, performance measurement, quality assurance and market relevance as other public services. Hong=Kong and Singapore's university reforms have led to corporatisation, marketisation and privatisation within the sector.

THE TENURED "CORE" AND THE TENUOUS "PERIPHERY": THE CASUALISATION OF ACADEMIC WORK IN AUSTRALIAN UNIVERSITIES

M. Kimber

Journal of Higher Education Policy and Management, Vol. 25, 2003, p.41-50

Over the past two decades a two-tier workforce has emerged in Australian universities, consisting of a tenured core with job security and good working conditions and a periphery consisting of academics employed on short-term contracts. The latter experience a high level of job insecurity, low wages and poor working conditions.

TRANSNATIONAL HIGHER EDUCATION IN CHINA: A PERSPECTIVE FROM CHINA

F. Huang

Higher Education Research and Development, Vol. 22, 2003, p.193-203

Transnational education is generally defined as education "in which learners are located in a country different from the one where the learning institution is based". Transnational higher education in China is currently closely controlled by the state through accreditation, registration and licensing of the TNHE institutions, restriction of curriculum development in particular fields and control of award types and levels. The most popular forms of TNHE in China are franchises, articulation, twinning, and study abroad. The major source countries and regions supplying transnational higher education services have changed from the USA in 1997 to Australia and Hong Kong today.

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