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Welfare Reform on the Web (Summer 2003): Mental Health Services - UK

BUILDING BETTER CARE IN A PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIP

N. Bosanquet and P. Catchpole

British Journal of Health Care Management, Vol. 9, 2003, p.212-213

The paper explores how a private provider of care for older people with severe learning disabilities worked with public sector funders to develop an innovative new service.

CHILD AND ADOLESCENT PSYCHIATRIC IN-PATIENT UNITS

A. Worrall, A. O'Herlihy and A. Mears

ChildRight, no. 196, 2003, p.10-11

Child and Adolescent psychiatric in-patient units treat severe mental health problems in young people. The article reports a study which aimed to summarise what helped them during their stay and what changes they themselves would make to their care.

THE ELEPHANTS IN THE ROOM

K. Parton

Mental Health Today, June 2003, p.31

The article discusses the need for on-going holistic support services to help people with mental health problems juggle work and home life. It explores the role of direct payments, the need for out-of-hours services, the importance of social network development, the value of access to early intervention and crisis management services, and the role of user consultation in service development.

A FOOT ON THE LADDER

C. Richardson and S. Quick

Mental Health Today, June 2003, p.28-30

The article describes the level 2 certificate in mental health work developed by the Mental Health Foundation, Pavilion Publishing and City & Guild's Affinity. It is a practical entry-level qualification for non-professionally trained workers starting out in mental health care. It forms the first step of a progression route to the vocational and vocationally related awards ladder that has emerged for frontline staff.

THE HIDDEN COSTS

F. Porritt

Health Which? June 2003, p.10-13

80% of people with mental health problems are treated entirely by the GP. A survey showed that 94% of respondents treated by their own doctor received medication. Alternatives to drug treatment, such as counselling or behavioural therapy, were often unavailable on the NHS. People either had to pay themselves or do without. It would help if people with chronic mental health problems were exempt from prescription charges. Alternative therapies with sufficient evidence of benefit should be available free.

A LITTLE KNOWLEDGE

N. Aylward

Community Care, May 29th-June 6th 2003, p.36-37

Young adults with mental health difficulties can benefit greatly from educational programmes which give them the chance to reintegrate into society and achieve their potential.

MENTAL ILLNESS "COSTS MORE THAN CRIME OR THE NHS"

J. Carvel

The Guardian, June 4th 2003, p.9

The cost of mental illness in England was more than £77bn last year according to the first estimate of the consequences of psychological problems.

THERE'S ANOTHER WAY

K. Leason

Community Care, June 5th-11th 2003, p.36-37

There is user demand for alternative therapies such as aromatherapy or acupuncture to be made available on the NHS for people with mental health problems. However, there are concerns over lack of resources into the effectiveness of these therapies and doubts about the regulation of treatments and training of providers.

WHAT'S THE DAMAGE?

M. Hope

Community Care, June 5th-11th 2003, p.38-40

The article argues that people with acquired brain injury being poorly served by health and social care services. They tend to be treated as either physically disabled or mentally ill, but their needs are substantially different from either client group. They could be effectively helped by targeted integrated health and social care in a community setting. A new national service framework for long-term conditions is in preparation which will focus on brain injury and neurological conditions, and which should lead to improved provision.

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