Click here to skip to content

Welfare Reform on the Web (Summer 2003): Education - UK - Schools

10.000 MISSING FROM SCHOOL

R Smithers

The Guardian, June 11th 2003, p.6

According to the Chief Inspector of Schools, an estimated 10,000 15-year-old pupils are "missing" from schools in England and are not accounted for anywhere in the system.

(See also: The Financial Times, June 11th 2003, p.7; The Independent, June 11th 2003, p.8)

AUTHORITIES HOT BACK AT CLARKE'S PLANS TO TAKE SCHOOL FUNDING OUT OF THEIR HANDS

K. Guha

Financial Times, June 6th 2003, p.4

Charles Clarke's plans to take school funding out of the hands of local education authorities have been denounced by local government leaders. Graham Lane, Chairman of the Local Governor's Association, said LEAs needed more power over school budgets, not less.

BRITISH PRIVATE SCHOOLS: RESEARCH ON POLICY AND PRACTICE

G. Walford

London: Woburn Press, 2003

The present new Labour government has reversed Labour's former opposition to private schools and sought co-operation between the two sectors. Such plans have led to an increasing interest in the realities of private schools, and several researchers have recently conducted studies of various aspects of this sector of schooling. This book brings together the best of the recently conducted research through a series of specially commissioned chapters.

BUILDING LEADERSHIP CAPACITY FOR SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT

A. Harris and L. Lambert

Maidenhead; Open University Press, 2003

This book provides a new perspective on the relationship between leadership and school improvement. It tackles fundamental questions such as:

  • what form of leadership promotes school improvement?
  • how do schools build leadership capacity?
  • how do schools sustain improvement in changing times?

Case studies demonstrate how leadership capacity can be built in schools that operate in different contexts, and practical material provided to assist schools in generating internal capacity for change and development. The central message is that investment in leadership at all levels in the school is invaluable in developing and sustaining school improvement.

CASH FEAR THREATENS SCHOOL TURNAROUND

R. Smithers

The Guardian, June 23rd, 2003, p.8

As part of the paper's long-term investigation into whether the government is delivering improvements to public services on the ground, the paper visits Salisbury school in Enfield, whose dramatic recovery may be endangered by the national education funding crisis.

CLARKE TO CUT LEAS OUT OF SCHOOL FUNDING

K. Guha

Financial Times, June 5th 2003, p.2

Charles Clarke will today pave the way for a historic change in the way schools are funded. The Education Secretary will say he does not see distributing money to schools as one of the core tasks of Local Education Authorities. It is the first public confirmation that the government is working towards a policy of direct funding for schools.

CLARKE ORDERS REVIEW OF SCHOOL HISTORY TEACHING

R. Garner

The Independent, June 16th 2003, p.4

Charles Clarke has ordered a review of the school history curriculum after complaints that pupils spend too much time learning about the Nazis and too little on British history.

CLARKE TURNS UP EXAM PRESSURE ON 14-YEAR OLDS

T. Haplin

The Times, June 16th 2003, p.1

Secondary school pupils face an extension to their workload under proposals by Charles Clarke, the Education Secretary, to have them tested in all subjects at the age of fourteen. Pupils' results would be recorded on a school certificate setting out the standards they had achieved before they began GCSE courses.

(See also The Guardian, June 16th 2003, p.2)

THE DELIVERY OF EDUCATION IN RURAL AREAS

Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Committee

London: TSO, 2003 (House of Commons Papers, Session 2002/03; HC467)

The report investigates how the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) works within government to facilitate the effective delivery of education in rural areas. It found little evidence that Defra is maintaining the delivery of education in rural areas or that it has been successful in representing the interests of rural areas in the formulation of education policy. Nor does it appear to have developed a role in co-ordinating policy responses in rural areas to the development of the transport and IT infrastructure that facilitate education provision.

EMPTY FEELING

P. Hetherington

Guardian Education, June 10th 2003, p.2-3

The article asks when falling rolls mean less cash and school closures, if there is a way to avoid closing schools, often the focal point of their community?

EXCELLENCE IN CITIES AND EDUCATION ACTION ZONES: MANAGEMENT AND IMPACT

Ofsted

London: 2003

This report evaluated the management and effect of two major programmes, Excellence in Cities (EIC) and Education Action Zones (EAZ) introduced by the Department of Education and Skills to improve educational achievement and promote social inclusion in disadvantaged areas. The report finds that EAZ's have been poorly organised and often wasted money but had greater success in raising standards in primary schools.

GIRLS AND EXCLUSION: RETHINKING THE AGENDA

A. Osler and K. Vincent

London: RoutledgeFalmer 2003

The authors believe that the widespread view that girls are succeeding in education and are therefore "not a problem" is a myth. By drawing directly on girls' own accounts the book offers new perspectives on exclusion and under achievement amongst girls. The authors argue for a re-definition of school exclusion which covers the types of exclusion commonly experienced by girls, such as truancy and self-exclusion, or school drop-out such as a result of pregnancy. The authors make recommendations as to how schools might develop as more inclusive communities where the needs of both boys and girls are addressed equally.

GOVERNORS FEEL THEY LACK POWER TO CARRY OUT DUTIES EFFECTIVELY

N. Timmins

Financial Times, June 9th 2003, p.6

Britain's system of lay oversight of schools, hospitals, police authorities and other public bodies is failing to do the task for which it exists. According to the office of public management, many school governors, NHS non-executive directors and board members of housing associations feel they are unable to do their jobs fully and effectively.

THE GREEN PAPER AND BEYOND: HOW PRIMARY HEADTEACHERS SEE THEIR DEPUTIES

D. Rutherford

School Leadership and Management, Vol. 23, 2003, p.59-74

The paper explores the impact of the New Labour green paper "Teachers Meeting the Challenge of Change" on the roles, responsibilities and relationship of the head and deputy in primary schools in England. Interviews with ten primary headteachers suggest the following key characteristics for an ideal partnership between a head and a deputy: shard values and vision; close personal and professional relationships; clarity about boundaries; and provision of non contact time.

MAKING SENSE OF THE DEVELOPMENT OF INCLUSIVE PRACTICES

M. Ainscow and others

European Journal of Special needs Education, Vol. 18, 2003, p.227-242

The paper summarises interim findings of collaborative action research in England on how inclusive practices develop and how they can be encouraged. It argues that this has to be seen as a social learning process, carried out within particular contexts. It explains that it is a process that requires collaborative working arrangements; that it can be encouraged by engagement with various forms of evidence that interrupt thinking; and that the space that is created through such interruptions can enable those involved to recognise overlooked or new possibilities for moving practice forward.

MORE SCHOOLS TO TAKE UP GRAMMAR COACHING SCHEME

L. Lightfoot

The Daily Telegraph, June 23rd, 2003, p.9

The scheme to coach children from poor homes for grammar school entry has been such a success that it may be expanded to other selective schools. The Sutton Trust, the education charity which sponsored the project, is persuading other schools to follow suit.

MR MOTIVATOR

S. Midgley

Public Finance, May 23rd-29th 2003, p.24-25

A report of an interview with Tim Brighouse., London's new schools czar. His task is to encourage collaboration between schools and local education authorities, with the aim of spreading best practice and raising educational standards.

OFFICIAL FIGURES REVEAL EXTENT OF SCHOOL JOB CUTS

W. Woodward

The Guardian, June 5th 2003, p.6

Claims in the Commons by the Education Secretary Charles Clarke that levels of teacher redundancies in England are no greater than in previous years are questioned by a survey which indicates they are on the rise. The returns by 50 local education authorities to a department for Education and Skills Survey on changes to staff numbers.

PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT FOR TEACHERS: HEADTEACHERS' PERSPECTIVES

The article discusses the implementation of performance management, one of the two strands of the UK government's performance related pay policy, form the perspective of 12 primary and secondary school headteachers. It found that performance management had been implemented with varying levels of success in the schools studied. It had slotted most easily into place in schools where a culture of reflection and appraisal was already in place. It was valued by all headteachers as a staff development tool, and led to greater understanding of the links between individual practice and the overall school development plan.

SCHOOL ADMISSION AND EXCLUSION APPEAL PANELS: SPECIAL REPORT

Council on Tribunals

London: TSO, 2003 (CM 5788)

The report considers a range of issues including:

  • the over representation of teachers on the panels;
  • the need for greater consistency in the arrangements for clerking appeal panel hearings;
  • the need for a clever and uniform policy on training for panel members;
  • the need for better guidance and information for parents about the appeals process and about access to local representation services;
  • concerns about the operation of admission appeal panels for voluntary-aided and foundation schools.

It recommends that exclusion appeals should be heard by the Special Educational Needs and Disability Tribunal, which has legally qualified chairs and a national structure. Admission appeals should be organised on a regional basis pending the establishment of a national system.

SCHOOL CUTS CLASSES TO BALANCE BOOKS

R. Smithers and W. Woodward

The Guardian, June 10th 2003, p.10

A cash-strapped Kent secondary school has become the first to announce it is cutting the school week to balance its books. Maplesden Noakes school in Maidstone said some pupils would have fewer classes and be sent home early from September.

SCHOOLS MAY GET THEIR OWN SOCIAL WORKERS

A. Frean

The Times, June 17th 2003, p.4

Social workers could be based in schools under plans to bring services for children under one roof. The decision to transfer child and family social services from the Department of Health to the Department of Education and Skills could lead to the move.

SECONDARY EDUCATION: DIVERSITY OF PROVISION

Education and Skills Committee

London: TSO, 2003 (House of Commons Papers, session 2002/03; HC 94)

The report investigates the effectiveness of the government's specialist secondary schools programme. The enquiry found a lack of sufficient research evidence to indicate whether the government's promotion of specialist schools is based on a secure foundation. There has been very little research on the impact of specialist schools; the government has placed too much emphasis on a narrow range of research on the comparative performance of specialist schools; and the committee found the five A*-C grades indicator for attainment at 16 to be an inadequate and misleading measure of pupil achievement. Narrow and simplistic measures of school improvement cannot provide adequate evidence as to the efficiency of the government's diversity policy across the ability range.

SHEFFIELD OPTS TO MAKE ALL SCHOOLS SPECIALIST

K. Guha

Financial Times, June 4th 2003, p.3

Sheffield will soon become the first city in Britain to turn all of its comprehensives into specialist schools.

TEACHERS CAN REFUSE TO PUT UP CLASSROOM DISPLAYS

R. Garner

The Independent, June 16th 2003, p.1

Every teacher in England will have the right to refuse to do several administrative tasks under a new contract to be unveiled by the government. The contract for teachers, which will stipulate 24 administrative duties to be done by support staff, will start in September.

VOTERS LOSING FAITH IN LABOUR ON EDUCATION, POLL SAYS

A. Travis

The Guardian, June 25th 2003, p.1

Labour has dramatically lost its reputation with voters for improving schools and education in the past three months, according to the results of the June Guardian JCM opinion poll.

WATCHDOG ACCUSES TEACHERS

W. Woodward

The Guardian, June 9th 2003, p.9

The government's disability rights watchdog has accused teaching unions of a "discriminatory" campaign to keep pupils with special needs outside mainstream schools.

Search Welfare Reform on the Web