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Welfare Reform on the Web (August 2003): Care of the Elderly - UK

ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY AND OLDER PEOPLE: LISTENING TO THEIR VIEWS

A.Tinker, C. Mccreadie and A. Turner-Smith

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 6, June 2003, p.27-30

Government policy favours supporting elderly people so that they can stay in their own homes as long as possible. Article reports on three pieces of research funded by the Engineering and Physical Science Research Council (EPSRC) which have attempted to draw on the views of older people about assistive technology and its role in enabling them to stay in their own homes.

CRACKDOWN OF AGEISM - BUT WORK UNTILL 70

T.Baldwin and E. Judge

The Times, July 2nd 2003, p.1

Millions of older people will get new rights under proposals that outlaw age discrimination. However, many may be forced into staying at work until they are 70.

The new regulations will come into force in October 2006 to bring the UK into line with EC directives.

(See also The Independent, July 2nd 2003, p.2; The Daily Telegraph, July 2nd 2003, p.1)

EQUALITY AND DIVERSITY: AGE MATTERS

Employment Relations

London: TSO, 2003

A consultation on proposals for outlawing age discrimination in employment and vocational training. It seeks views on proposals for the implementation of the new anti-discrimination law under the European Employment Directive. It is the first consultation to focus exclusively on proposals for old age. Age matters seeks views on issues including:

  • retirement age;
  • recruitment;
  • selection and promotion;
  • pay and non-pay benefits;
  • unfair dismissal;
  • employment-related insurance and statutory redundancy payments.

HOME ALONE

H. Kaur Grewal

Guardian Society, July 16th 2003, p. 10-11

Contrary to popular belief, elderly Asian people can no longer rely on their relatives for care. Many Asians who arrived in Britain midway through their working lives did not have a chance to build up a healthy pension and what they have now is not enough to live on as they grow older. However mainstream care providers often fail elderly people from ethnic minorities, believing that the extended family is still sufficient.

IMPROVING COMMUNICATION BETWEEN HOSPITALS AND CARE HOMES: THE DEVELOPMENT OF A DAILY LIVING PLAN FOR OLDER PEOPLE

J. Reed and D. Stanley

Health and Social Care in the Community, vol.11, 2003, p.256-363

Study describes a project that produced a Daily Living Plan (DLP) through a partnership between older people and health and social care staff. The DLP was designed to facilitate communication of daily living preferences of older people so that continuity of care and support could be maintained and future care planned on an individualised basis when they moved from hospital to a care home.

INSTITUTIONAL AGEISM

R. Levenson

Community Care, July 17th-23rd 2003, p.42-43

Discusses the prevalence of age discrimination in health and social care. This is often subtle and based more on ageist attitudes than deliberate policy. Scrutiny groups have now been set up across the country to identify and root out ageism in health and social care services.

OLDER PEOPLE AND ACCESS TO CARE

D. Tanner

British Journal of Social Work, vol. 33, 2003, p.499-515

Article considers the impact of a number of New Labour policy initiatives aimed at supporting independence, preventing deterioration and extending access to services. Examines the potential impact of these initiatives on older people with "low level" needs who have been increasingly excluded from services targeted on those in high risk categories. Finds that the new preventive measures are likely to do little to widen access to support services for those with low intensity needs, and that the processes involved in identifying those at future high risk are stigmatising and stand to isolate older people.

ONE FOR ALL

M. Hunter

Community Care, July 3rd-9th 2003, p.30-31

Reports progress of preparations by local authorities to implement the single needs assessment process for older people. This is due to come into force in April 2004, but preparation is being slowed by lack of funding and confusion over government guidance.

RISING SAP

K. Wilson

Health Service Journal, vol.113, July 10th 2003, p.32

Outlines the key challenges of implementing a single assessment process for older people. Single assessment is complex, involving a variety of agencies, professions and functions. A single assessment process lead needs to be appointed with support from senior management in all relevant organisations.

SCOTTISH DEVOLUTION: IDENTITY AND IMPACT AND THE CASE OF COMMUNITY CARE FOR THE ELDERLY

N. Marnoch

Public Administration, vol.81, 2003, p.253-273

Article examines the impact of Scottish devolution using the issue of free personal care for older people as a case study.

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