Click here to skip to content

Welfare Reform on the Web (August 2003): Social Housing - UK

£1.5BN BOOST TO COUNCIL HOUSING

P.Hetherington

The Guardian, July 28th 2003, p.6

In a dramatic policy shift, the government will today renew its faith in council housing with a £1.5bn boost to improve sub-standard housing around England. But the initiative involves selected councils giving up the day-to-day management of housing and handing powers to new arm's-length organisations to improve standards by 2010.

THE ACCOMMODATION GAME

M. Delargy and E. Hawkey

Roof, July/Aug. 2003, p.14-20

Discusses competition for scarce social housing amongst key public sector workers such as nurses who have been priced out of the private housing market, homeless families and existing tenants seeking transfers.

ALL STICK AND NO CARROT

S. Povey

Roof, July/Aug. 2003, p.29

The Anti-Social Behaviour Bill includes a provision for "demoting" the social housing tenancies of people guilty of anti-social behaviour. Demotion reduces security of tenure and facilitates the process of eviction by the landlord.

BOARD GAMES

N. Merrick

Public Finance, July 18th-24th 2003, p.24-25

Funding for social housing will now be allocated by a network of regional housing boards instead of going directly to local authorities and housing associations.

HOME IS WHERE THE HATE IS

S. Thorp

Housing, June 2003, p.30-33

Discusses the housing needs of women fleeing domestic violence. Covers refuge provision, the need for move-on accommodation, resettlement support services, and assisting victims to stay in their own homes through installation of extra security.

NO PAIN, NO GAIN

B. Guilfoyle

Roof, July/Aug. 2003, p.33

Manchester City Council has become the first to sign a private finance initiative (PFI) contract for the regeneration of one of its sink estates. Article describes the lessons learned.

THE SHARE OPTION

J. Birch

Roof, July/Aug. 2003, p.22-24

Low cost home ownership schemes include tenants' right to buy their council houses/flats as well as shared ownership. The former reduces the supply of social housing while the latter modestly expands it. However demand for shared ownership homes vastly outstrips supply. Notes that the government has set up a serious inquiry into low cost home ownership schemes. The inquiry will seek means to balance helping people realise their goal of owning their own homes with the need to minimise loss of social housing.

SUPPORTING PEOPLE: WHATEVER NEXT?

N. Miller

Housing, Care and Support, vol.6, June 2003, p.4-9

Discusses practical issues related to the implementation of the Supporting People programme. Key questions remain unanswered about care standards and regulation, long-term funding arrangements for the scheme, and users' right to choose what services they wish to receive.

SUPPORTING PEOPLE: A PROPER CONTRACTUAL FRAMEWORK BETWEEN FUNDERS, HOUSING, SUPPORT AND CARE PROVIDERS

L. Murray

Housing, Care and Support, vol.6, June 2003, p.15-19

The separation of housing from support and care services should lead to greater user choice. The process of separation has exposed the need for co-ordination between housing, care and support to give a proper contractual framework of accountability and responsibility towards the tenant. Article gives some of the detail of funding, tenancy, support and agency agreements which provide the formal structure for joined-up working.

SUPPORTING PEOPLE ON THE MARGINS: WHO REALLY NEEDS HOUSING-RELATED SUPPORT?

L. Watson and others

Housing, Care and Support, vol.6, June 2003, p.10-14

Reports on a review of the Supporting People programme by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation which was conducted in the run-up to its implementation. There is concern that the involvement of social services and health agencies in planning and service commissioning could lead to resources going into mainstream community care and health programmes, leaving less money available to help those who need supported housing because they are homeless, are on probation or have just been released from prison. Review also looked at support for people in private sector housing, floating support, and innovative models of housing related support.

WE DID IT OUR WAY

D. Palmer

Public Finance, July 4th-10th 2003, p.28-29

Describes how Bradford City Council managed the transfer of its housing stock in a way that enjoyed tenant support. After extensive public consultation, it set up six area trusts under an umbrella trust, the Bradford Community Housing Trust. This is an independent, non-profitmaking body able to borrow money to pay for refurbishment.

Search Welfare Reform on the Web