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Welfare Reform on the Web (August 2003): Education - UK - Schools

£400m EXTRA FOR SCHOOLS TO COUNTER FUNDING CRISIS

J. Kelly

Financial Times, July 18th 2003, p.2

Schools were yesterday promised £400m extra next year - and emergency cash in some cases this year - as Charles Clarke confronted concern that that the funding crisis would derail Labour's school reforms. The Education Secretary said he would use his department's underspend to fund a lifeline.

(See also The Independent, July 18th 2003, p.8; The Guardian July 18th 2003, p.3;

The Times, July 18th 2003, p.10)

A LEVELS AND GCSEs TO BE SWEPT AWAY

T. Halpin

The Times, July 16th 2003, p. 1

Moves to replace A levels and GCSEs with a new school diploma will begin in three years' time under the biggest reform of examinations for half a century. Children entering their final year of primary school this September would be the first to "graduate" with the new school diploma at 18, under plans that would scrap the A level by 2011. GCSEs would disappear by 2009. The proposals will be set out today by Mike Tomlinson, the former chief Inspector of Schools and will include plans for a broad diploma at four levels of difficulty, with students accumulating credits through the courses they choose. Labour is expected to include the diploma in its next election manifesto.

(See also Financial Times, July 17th 2003, p.4; Daily Telegraph, July 17th 2003, p.1; The Independent, July 17th 2003, p.4; The Guardian, July 17th 2003, p.13)

AFRICAN TEACHERS HIRED TO FILL JOBS FACE DEPORTATION

R. Garner

The Independent, July 28th 2003, p.4

African teachers bought to Britain to help solve the staffing crisis in schools face deportation because they can no longer find jobs. The teachers, mainly from South Africa and Zimbabwe, have been made redundant by the agency that hired them and face deportation when their permission to stay in the UK expires at the end of September.

CREATIVE APPROACHES TO COMMUNITY COHESION

R.Vincent and M. Coles

Race Equality Teaching, vol.21, Summer 2003, p.6-10

Article explains the background and underlying principles of Community Cohesion and some of the funding streams that support it. It outlines how Leicester City Local Education Authority allocated some of its Neighbourhood Renewal Fund money to support its Education Development Plan Priority 8, "Literacy in Development Groups", and describes some of the projects that arose from this decision.

DEVOLUTION AND DISABILITY EQUALITY LEGISLATION: THE IMPLEMENTATION OF PART 4 OF THE DISABILITY DISCRIMINATION ACT 1995 IN ENGLAND AND SCOTLAND

S. Riddell

British Journal of Special Education, vol.30, 2003, p.63-69

Part 4 of the Disability Discrimination Act 1995 came into force in September 2002. The Act covers Great Britain, but in relation to schools, is implemented through different special educational needs legislation in England and Scotland. Article explores the key differences in these legal frameworks and discusses their implications for delivering consistent anti-discrimination policies North and South of the border. If major differences in the implementation of the legislation emerge over time, there may be a need to consider the case for devolving responsibility for equal opportunities to the Scottish Parliament or amending national education legislation to make it more consistent.

THE DFES CONSULTATION DOCUMENT "AIMING HIGH: ISSUES AND CHALLENGES"

C. Vieler-Porter

Race Equality Teaching, vol.21, Summer 2003, p.42-44

Comments on proposals in the consultation document "Aiming High", which set out the government's latest ideas on addressing differential educational attainment by ethnicity. Comments cover proposals on the role of school governors, the National Primary and Key Stage 2 Strategies, the future of specialist staff, and the impact of the Race Relations (Amendment) Act.

DISABLED CHILDREN AND RESIDENTIAL SCHOOLS: THE IMPLICATIONS FOR LOCAL EDUCATION PROFESSIONALS

J. Morris, D. Abbott and L. Ward

British Journal of Special Education, vol.30, 2003, p.70-75

Research looked at whether the present system of legislation and regulation is adequately protecting disabled children placed in residential schools. Article summarises some of the findings of the research in relation to decision-making processes leading to residential special school placements and the involvement of education and social services authorities after placements have been made. Research found that the needs of individual children are not central to these decision-making processes and that local authorities do not pay sufficient attention to protecting or promoting the children's educational or care needs once they have gone away to school.

DROP A-LEVELS TO BROADEN AREA OF STUDY, SAYS INQUIRY

R.Garner

The Independent, July 7th 2003, p.8

Plans for a new baccalaurete-style certificate with compulsory studies in English and Maths in the sixth form will be unveiled this month. Mike Tomlinson, the former chief inspector of schools, will put the case for a three tier "baccalaurete" to replace existing GCSEs and A-Levels in a consultation paper to be published next month.

THE ELASTICATED LEARNER: BEYOND CURRICULUM LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES IN A LOCAL EDUCATION AUTHORITY

M. Huxtable

Gifted Education International, vol.17, 2003, p.140-150

Argues that varied out-of-school learning opportunities need to be developed to enable gifted children to realise their potential. Proposes that Renzulli's Enrichment Triad model be used to develop coherent provision. Uses the Saturday Workshop's and Summer Schools offered as part of the APEX project in Bath and North Somerset as an illustrative example.

EXCELLENCE IN ENGLISH CITIES: GIFTED AND TALENTED EDUCATION AND THE NATIONAL TRAINING PROGRAMME FOR "GIFTED AND TALENTED COORDINATORS"

H. Lowe

Gifted Education International, vol.17, 2003, p.120-129

The government's Excellence in Cities school improvement programme seeks to ensure that gifted and talented pupils in designated state schools, many of which operate in deprived areas, are identified and provided with opportunities to fulfil their potential. Article describes the national training programme for "gifted and talented coordinators" who act as resident experts and curriculum leaders in such schools.

GIFTED AND TALENTED YOUTH: THE NATIONAL ACADEMY

University of Warwick [and] Department for Education and Skills

Gifted Education International, vol. 17, 2003, p.130-133

Describes the outreach programme of the National Academy for Gifted and Talented Youth established at the University of Warwick. This includes provision of online learning materials and residential Summer Schools.

GOVERNING THROUGH GOVERNANCE: EDUCATION POLICY CONTROL UNDER NEW LABOUR

I. Bache

Political Studies, vol. 51, 2003, p.300-314

Control over education policy in England rests firmly with the national government. However, there is a strong role in policy delivery for local authorities and increasingly for governors and headteachers of individual schools. The structure is multi-level (national, local and sub-local). Article examines two aspects of education policy characterised by multi-level governance: the role of local education authorities and the education funding process.

HERE TODAY, GONE TOMORROW

P. Revell

Public Finance, July 11th-17th 2003, p.22-23

Argues that targeted government funding for innovative projects in education can be wasteful because it is short term. When the funding stops, the projects are closed down and any benefits are lost. Challenge funding of this kind also increases the workloads of the managers who have to prepare the bids and report on the targets attached to the money.

LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT: WHAT INSPECTION TELLS US

Ofsted

London: 2003 (HMI 1646)

The report summarises Ofsted's inspection evidence about leadership and management in schools. It describes strengths, illustrated by examples of good practice, and weaknesses, and explores the link between leadership and management and the quality of the work of the school.

LESSONS IN FAILURE

T. Butler

Foster Care, issue 114, 2003, p.14-16

Discusses educational achievement targets for young people in care, which the UK government has recently reduced leading to a storm of criticism. Emphasizes the importance of adult support in enabling disadvantaged young people to succeed.

NEW LABOUR AND EDUCATION

S. Tomlinson

Children and Society, vol.17, 2003, p.195-204

New Labour has continued to favour parental choice and competition between schools, selection by private, grammar and specialist schools, a diversity of schools with unequal intakes and resources, a standards agenda that requires more and more testing, centralised control of teachers and the curriculum and an academic-vocational divide. Despite a rhetoric of inclusion, such policies have ensured that education remains divided and divisive.

OFFICIAL WARNING OF ANOTHER A-LEVEL FIASCO

R. Smithers and P. Curtis

The Guardian, July 4th 2003, p.1

The Education Secretary, Charles Clarke, has been warned that the government could face a repeat of lasts year's A-level debacle after a Parliamentary Select Committee threw out its official explanation of its role in the affair as "unsatisfactory". The Commons Education and Skills committee says it is "not confident" the government has learnt the lessons of last year.

PRINCIPLES FOR REFORM OF 14-19 LEARNING PROGRAMMES AND QUALIFICATIONS

Working Group on 14-19 Reform

Annersley: DfES Publications, 2003

Consultation report asking for comments on the Group's proposals so far. They propose that all 14-19-year-olds should follow a balanced curriculum covering foundation skills (literacy, numeracy and IT), specialist academic or vocational learning, and supplementary learning to facilitate their progress. Young people should work towards a single high status diploma covering the whole of their learning programme, rather than existing individual qualifications such as GCSEs or NVQs. In order to achieve a diploma, young people would complete a mixture of specialist, general and supplementary learning divided into a range of modules. Under the new system young people would take fewer written examinations than at present, but there would be more assessment by teachers.

SCHOOL DETENTION: VIOLATING A PUPIL'S RIGHT TO LIBERTY

Y. Spencer

ChildRight, no.197, 2003, p.17-18

Article explains how the Human Rights Act 1998 may affect the lawful use of detentions as disciplinary measures within schools.

SEX LESSONS FOR FIVE-YEAR OLDS 'SHOULD BE COMPULSORY'

J. Carvel

The Guardian, July 11th 2003, p.11

Compulsory sex education for five-year-olds will be demanded today by Government advisers on teenage pregnancy, as an essential step towards halving the under-18 conception rate by 2010.

(See also The Independent, July 11th 2003, p.9)

SOME LESSONS FROM USING PFI FOR SCHOOL BUILDING PROJECTS

R. Ball, M. Heafey and D. King

Local Government Studies, vol.29, 2003, p.89-106

Research primarily based on participant observation explores key issues relevant to the effective management of private finance initiative (PFI) projects for provision of new school buildings. Issues covered by the research include council motivation for choosing PFI, impact on staff, ownership of the building, community involvement and various financial matters.

TIME'S UP FOR OFSTED

T. Mooney

Guardian Education, July 8th 2003, p.2-3

Article asks if inspections do not improve exam performance, should we still be funding them?

TORIES PROMISE TO REVIVE ASSISTED PLACES SCHEME

T. Halpin

The Times, July 18th 2003, p. 10

In a significant policy shift the Tories announced yesterday that parents would be given state funding to buy places for their children at fee-paying schools, a proposal that effectively revives the assisted places scheme.

'WE DID'NT THINK IT WOULD BE SO BAD. ALL THE QUALITY YOU SEE IS UNDER THREAT'

W. Woodward

The Guardian, July 18th 2003, p.7

The author witnesses the pain the schools funding crisis is inflicting on one widely admired comprehensive - Plymstock School in Plymouth.

WHY NEXT YEAR'S SUMS COULD BE A DISASTER

R. Garner

The Independent, July 14th 2003, p.6

The survey of education budgets by the paper reveals that one in five schools is asking parents for extra contributions to help ease funding problems.

WORKING TOGETHER: GIVING CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE A SAY

Department for Education and Skills

Annersley: DfES Publications, 2003

Consultation document sets out proposals for helping local education authorities (LEAs), governing bodies and schools to consider the views of children and young people and involve them in decision-making, as provided by Section 176 of the Education Act 2002. The aim is to open up opportunities for children to become more active participants in their education, including involvement in planning and evaluation of their own learning.

WORLD CLASS ARENA: PROVIDING AN INTERNATIONAL PERSPECTIVE ON ASSESSING GIFTED AND TALENTED STUDENTS

J. Waldren

Gifted Education International, vol.17, 2003, p.134-139

Describes the development by the UK Qualifications and Curriculum Agency of World Class tests for use in the identification of gifted and talented students in an international context.

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