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Welfare Reform on the Web (September 1999): Social Care - UK - Community Care

CHANGE YOUR PARTNERS

T. Hunter
Community Care, no. 1277, 1999, p. 24

Describes how the Social Services Department of the East Riding of Yorkshire Council worked in partnership with independent sector home care providers to improve services while reducing costs.

COMMUNITY CARE FOR NURSES AND THE CARING PROFESSIONS

N. Malin and others
Buckingham: Open University Press, 1999

Provides a concise introduction to policy and practice issues in community care. Explains the concepts behind the community care policy and demonstrates their relevance to work in healthcare settings.

SUPPORTING FAMILIES: SUMMARY OF RESPONSES TO THE CONSULTATION DOCUMENT

Home Office
London: TSO, 1999

The key messages from the responses are:

  • support for the establishment of a National Family and Parenting Institute and a national helpline for parents;
  • general agreement that health visitors have a valuable role in providing support to families;
  • recognition that family-friendly employment practices need to be encouraged;
  • recognition of the key role of grandparents in helping young families;
  • support for the proposal to introduce a statement of rights and responsibilities for those planning to marry;
  • support for the proposals on infomation meetings and division of property on divorce.

TARGETED COMMUNITY CARE HARMS PREVENTION

N. Valios
Community Care, no. 1277, p. 6

Community care has been veering away from provision of low level services that help elderly people keep control of their own lives, and budgets are more and more targeted towards those with the highest level of support needs.

WE'RE IN THIS TOGETHER: CONVERSATIONS WITH FAMILIES IN CARING RELATIONSHIPS

S. Becker and R. Silburn
London: Carers National Association, 1999

Recommends that:

  • health and social care support should not be withheld because a family carer is available;
  • full-time carers should be offered a reassessment of their needs at least every six months;
  • social services should develop an extensive network of local short-term break schemes;
  • the direct payments scheme should be expanded to include disabled people;
  • legislation should be introduced to ensure that carers receive services and support in their own right;
  • a direct payments scheme for carers should be introduced urgently;
  • the provision of one-stop shops or single points of entry for a complete range of services should be extended;
  • information services should be improved so that families are fully aware of their entitlements to benefits and service;
  • the benefits application process and the assessment process for health and social care need to be better integrated.

THE WELLFAMILY SERVICE: A NEW MODEL OF SUPPORT

A. Cook
Community Practitioner, vol. 72, 1999, p. 168-171

Describes the first, pilot Wellfamily Service that began operation from a general practice in Hackney in 1996. Concludes that the WellFamily Service is central to the search for early intervention models aimed at supporting families. It is reaching some of the families who are slipping through the net of support services which other families can access easily, and it is beginning to provide an acceptable and holistic service to some of these families. It operates in line with government policy for the provision of effective early intervention services and the promotion of effective parenting.

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