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Welfare Reform on the Web (September 2003): Homelessness - UK

HOUSING ASSOCIATIONS - REHOUSING WOMEN LEAVING DOMESTIC VIOLENCE: NEW CHALLENGES AND GOOD PRACTICE

C. Davis

Bristol: The Policy Press, 2003

Housing associations are essential to the government's strategy for improving social housing yet have no direct statutory responsibility for re-housing homeless people. This study critically examines the role of housing associations in responding to the needs of women who have become homeless due to domestic violence. Issues studied include:

  • the role of housing associations in re-housing homeless people
  • the impact of competition on housing management
  • the nature of inter-agency relationships in a multi-racial environment
  • domestic violence policy and 'best practice'
  • housing association access, assessment and allocation process

LIFE AT THE EDGE

H. Morbey, J. Pannell and R. Means

Community Care, Aug.14th-20th 2003, p.36-37

Older homeless people have been overlooked in the government's initiatives to combat social exclusion. They depend on support from specialist voluntary organisations which are themselves fragile due to uncertain funding.

RESETTLEMENT OF OLDER HOMELESS PEOPLE: WHAT WORKS AND REASONS FOR FAILURE

M. Crane and A.M. Warnes

Housing, Care and Support, vol.6, Aug.2003, p.18-25

Paper presents evidence from a longitudinal study of the resettlement of 64 older homeless people which monitored their progress for two years after re-housing. Results show that people who moved to independent flats, particularly sheltered accommodation, were more likely to be settled than those who moved to shared living arrangements. Problems arose with the behaviour of co-tenants in shared housing and from the poor condition of some of the properties offered. Successful resettlement was also more likely when good support was available from housing workers.

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