Click here to skip to content

Welfare Reform on the Web (September 2003): Mental Health Services - UK

ADULTS WITH INCAPACITY (SCOTLAND) ACT 2000: CODE OF PRACTICE FOR MANAGERS OF AUTHORISED ESTABLISHMENTS UNDER PART 4 OF THE ACT

Scottish Executive

2003 (SE/2003/177)

Part 4 of the Act provides a mechanism for managers of certain care establishments (including care homes and hospitals) to manage the finances of adults who, in the opinion of a medical practitioner, are incapable of managing them. Code sets out the principles, rules and guidelines which should be followed by managers in meeting their obligations in this area, and also explains the obligations laid on supervisory bodies.

ADULTS WITH INCAPACITY (SCOTLAND) ACT 2000: CODE OF PRACTICE FOR SUPERVISORY BODIES UNDER PART 4 OF THE ACT

Scottish Executive

2003 (SE/2003/176)

Part 4 of the Act provides a mechanism for managers of certain care establishments (including care homes and hospitals) to manage the finances of adults who, in the opinion of a medical practitioner, are incapable of managing them. Code sets out the principles, rules and guidelines which should be followed by supervisory bodies in meeting their obligations in this area, and also explains the obligations laid on managers. There are three supervisory bodies for the purposes of part 4 of the Act: NHS Boards, the State Hospital Board, and the Scottish Commission for the Regulation of Care.

AIM4: A HOLISTIC APPROACH TO EMPLOYMENT

E. Harbridge

Community Living, vol.16, no.4, 2003, p.24-25

Aim4 is a community placement service based in Nuneaton, Warwickshire, which helps people with learning difficulties find and keep jobs.

BILL OF NO RIGHTS

J. Collins

Community Care, Aug.28th-Sept.3rd 2003, p.32-33

The draft Mental Incapacity Bill focuses on providing a legal framework in which other people are enabled to make decisions on behalf of any person thought to lack capacity to decide for themselves. Instead it should have focused on developing alternative structures of decision-making, including supported decision-making, as the basis of a new legal framework designed to enable everyone to maximise their decision-making capabilities.

CAPACITY TO DECIDE

L. Carr

Professional Social work, Aug. 2003, p.10-11

Summarises the provisions of the draft Mental Incapacity Bill for England and Wales. Focuses on the Bill's definition of mental incapacity and the three proposed methods of making decisions on behalf of someone deemed mentally incapable. This can be done through a new Lasting Power of Attorney, by a court-appointed deputy, and informally by carers or health professionals on a day-to-day basis.

CONNECTING VULNERABLE PEOPLE TO THEIR COMMUNITIES: EASY TO SAY AND HARD TO DO?

C. Poll

Housing, Care and Support, vol.6, Aug. 2003, p.26-31

One of the central principles of the Valuing People white paper is that people with learning difficulties should be included in society. From involvement in a community comes a sense of belonging, of safety, and of importance and entitlement. Article suggests that, instead of focusing on people's needs, services should concentrate on their strengths and capacities. Describes a method which begins with a inventory of someone's capacity and then builds a corresponding list of the assets of the community. It then focuses on building mutually beneficial partnerships between disabled people and local individuals, organisations and associations.

HOUSING FOR ADULTS WITH A LEARNING DISABILITY: "I WANT TO CHOOSE, BUT THEY DON'T LISTEN"

L. Gorfin and A. McGlaughlin

Housing, Care and Support, vol.6, Aug.2003, p.4-8

The government's Valuing People white paper promises service users with learning difficulties greater choice and control over where they live. Paper reports results of interviews with 72 people with learning difficulties in a local authority area about their housing preferences. Results show that adults with a learning disability are often very well able to articulate their housing preferences and should therefore be the focus of all decisions.

POWER IN THE COMMUNITY: HOW COMMUNITY GROUPS CAN ACHIEVE THEIR GOALS

A. Bright

Community Living, vol.16, no.4, 2003, p.13-16

The Elfrida Society's Community Development Project has worked across the London Boroughs of Islington, Camden and Westminster. It has so supported and mentored people with learning difficulties that they have been able to establish their own community groups, some of which have become community enterprises.

TRANSITION FROM ADOLESCENCE TO YOUNG ADULTHOOD: IS PARTNERSHIP WORKING UP TO THE TASK?

B. Hudson

Journal of Integrated Care, vol.11, Aug.2003, p.43-46

The transition from adolescence to young adulthood for people with learning difficulties is fraught with complexities, due to the wide range of helping services involved. Article explores whether current tools for partnership working enable these agencies to collaborate to effect a smooth transition from child to adult services.

Search Welfare Reform on the Web