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Welfare Reform on the Web (September 2003): National Health Service - Community and Primary Care

BLUE LIGHT THINKING

H. Mooney

Health Service Journal, vol.113, Aug.21st, 2003, p.24-25

London Ambulance Service chief executive Peter Bradley discusses national standards and targets, full integration of the service into the NHS, the need to increase capacity by enlarging some very small trusts, and the benefits of encouraging ambulance staff into management.

COMMISSION IMPOSSIBLE

C. James

Primary Care Report, vol.5, Aug.13th 2003, p.14, 17

Primary care trusts are supposed to be in the driving seat of the new system for commissioning hospital care, but they face an array of obstacles and contradictory imperatives that need to be reconciled.

END OF QUEUE FOR NHS DENTISTS 'IS IN SIGHT'

O. Wright

The Times, August 13th 2003, p.10

Every person in England and Wales will be able to see a dentist on the NHS under plans to overhaul dental services over the next three years. Ministers will guarantee that, from 2005, no dentist will be worse off if they abandon private practice and return to the NHS. Patients are likely, however, to get only one appointment a year under the new system.

(See also The Guardian, August 13th 2003, p.9)

ENGAGING GPs IN THE NEW NHS

NHS Alliance, 2003

Report suggests ways in which the three-way partnership between clinicians, managers and lay board members can be restored in primary care. In the face of GPs' disenchantment with primary care trusts, report claims there has been a swell of decision-making power in the hands of PCT chairs and chief executives. Calls on the Department of Health (DoH) to promote clinical engagement by:

  • building it into the job descriptions of the chief medical officer and senior executives at the DoH;
  • making it a significant performance measure for both strategic health authorities and PCTs;
  • placing a PCT professional executive committee (PEC) chair on the Modernisation Agency board.

ETHNICITY, HEALTH, AND PRIMARY CARE

J. Kai

Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2003

This book is intended as a broad introduction to ethnicity and healthcare for a wide range of professionals. Although focusing on primary care, the book's general principals will be relevant to other health and social care practitioners, in addition to those developing health services. The book also considers major clinical topics of particular concern for the health of diverse ethnic communities in the UK.

EVALUATING USER INVOLVEMENT IN PRIMARY CARE

J. Allsop and A. Taket

International Journal of Healthcare Technology and Management, vol.5, 2003, p.34-44

Current health policies, both in the UK and abroad, call for a shift from secondary to primary healthcare and for increased involvement of service users and their communities in decisions about their own care and about the way in which health services are provided. Study evaluated the way in which users were involved in two London-based primary care development projects.

GP CONTRACT: PICK UP THE BALL AND RUN WITH IT

M. Farrar

Primary Care Report, vol.5, July 23rd 2003, p.11-13

Discusses the implications of the new GP contract for primary care trusts. It can be approached as a purely technical change (a new method of paying GPs) or as a strategic change leading to a significant upgrade of primary care services.

GPs' LAZY PATIENTS WASTING £250M

C. Hall

Daily Telegraph, Aug.28th 2003, p.6

A survey by Doctor Patient Partnership has shown that patients fail to turn up to an estimated 12.6 million family doctor appointments per year and miss another 4.4 million with practice nurses. With each GP appointment valued at £18.00, doctors estimate the cost of those missed at £250m annually.

IT'S NOT WRITTEN IN THE STARS

P. Convery

Primary Care Report, vol.5, Aug. 13th 2003, p.6-7

Reports results of a survey of primary care trusts with low ratings. Trusts blame their problems on difficulties with their acute hospitals, under-funding, and staff shortages. They also feel that the ratings system is inflexible, and does not take account of extenuating circumstances.

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