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Welfare Reform on the Web (October 2003): Care of the Elderly (UK)

CHANGING FROM CARE HOME TO SUPPORTED LIVING

P. Grose

Caring Times, Sept. 2003, p.12 + 14

Alternative Futures had sought to de-register a number of its care homes by setting up a scheme whereby the residents were given tenancy agreements for their rooms. Care would then be provided by Alternative Futures acting as a domiciliary care agency, providing care for residents "in their own homes". This ploy was intended to free Alternative Futures from the costs and red tape involved in running registered care homes. The National Care Standards Commission mounted a legal challenge and the Care Standards Tribunal found in their favour.

DISCRIMINATION AGAINST SELF-FUNDING RESIDENTS IN LONG-TERM RESIDENTIAL CARE IN ENGLAND

F. Wright

Ageing and Society, vol.23, 2003, p.603-664

Paper reports results of research on older people paying the full cost of their long-term residential or nursing home care in England. Data were collected through:

  • a postal survey of senior finance officers in social services departments;
  • telephone interviews with a sample of them;
  • interviews with self-funding residents, care home providers and relatives.

Self-funding residents were commonly relatively physically independent on admission to a care home. They were frequently encouraged to admit themselves directly without a needs assessment. Once admitted, they tended to pay higher fees than publicly funded residents, whom they were therefore subsidising. Wide variations were also found in local authorities' willingness to make a contract with care home providers on behalf of older people able to meet the full costs of their care.

ELDERLY 'BETRAYED' BY CARE TERMS

J. Carvel

The Guardian, September 29th 2003, p.9

The government was accused yesterday by the Royal Commission on Long Term Care for the Elderly of "betraying" millions of older people by refusing to accept its recommendation of free personal care for those who are no longer fit to look after themselves. In an unprecedented move, nine members of the commission, which reported in 1999, reassembled to condemn the government's failure to act.

(See also The Independent: September 29th 2003, p.6)

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