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Welfare Reform on the Web (October 2003): Social Housing - UK

BORROWED TIME

J. Birch

Roof, Sept./Oct, 2003, p.22-23

Poor people needing access to credit are often forced to borrow at high interest rates from loan sharks, doorstep lenders and catalogue firms as they are excluded from the services of banks and building societies. Social landlords should be doing more to help tenants in debt by using some of their assets to set up community finance institutions. These would offer a range of services from loans to small businesses to financial education.

GOOD COP, BAD COP

J. Forsyth

Roof, Sept./Oct 2003, p.16-17

Report of an interview with Margaret Curran, Scottish Minister for Communities. Recent housing legislation in Scotland has given every individual the right to a home, but this is balanced by proposed new sanctions against anti-social behaviour by tenants.

LET THEM PAY MORE

D. Hoodless

Roof, Sept./Oct 2003, p.11

Argues that social housing rents should be based on a tenant's ability to pay, so that key workers on reasonable incomes such as teachers or nurses would pay more than unemployed people.

WHAT MATTERS IS WHAT WE SAY

S. Hilditch

Roof, Sept./Oct 2003, p.37

The government is offering councils three options for improving their housing stock: private finance schemes, large-scale voluntary transfer to a registered social landlord and setting up an ALMO (Arms Length Management Organisation). Author argues that it is bad policy to prevent efficient councils from directly managing their own housing.

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